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I have the following file:

this is the first line
and this is the second line
now it is the third line
wow, the fourth line
but now it's the fifth line
etc...
etc...
etc...

Starting from "now it is the third line" to "but now it's the fifth line", how do I copy those three lines (without knowing the line numbers of those lines)? In perl, you would do something like:

/^now it is/../^but now/

What is the equivalent in python?

I have (which obviously only grabs 1 of the lines):

regex = re.compile("now it is")
for line in content:
    if regex.match(line):
        print line

EDIT:

reg = re.compile(r"now it is.*but now it.*", re.MULTILINE | re.DOTALL)

matches = reg.search(urllib2.urlopen(url).read())
for match in matches.group():
    print match

This prints:

n
o
w

i
t

i
s

.
.
.

ie it returns characters and not the complete line

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you just need to see re.MULTILINE flag. Thanks to it you can perform similar match and get the text that is combined from the lines you want.

EDIT:

The complete solution involves using re.MULTILINE and re.DOTALL flags, plus non-greedy regexp:

>>> text = """this is the first line
and this is the second line
now it is the third line
wow, the fourth line
but now it's the fifth line
etc...
etc...
etc..."""
>>> import re
>>> match = re.search('^(now it is.*?but now.*?)$', text, flags=re.MULTILINE|re.DOTALL)
>>> print match.group()
now it is the third line
wow, the fourth line
but now it's the fifth line
share|improve this answer
    
That looks good but I'm not quite sure how to use it....something like re.compile(r"^now it is.*but now$", re.MULTILINE)? –  llamawithabowlcut Apr 19 '12 at 0:10
    
@user522962: Something like that, but you should also add another flag (re.DOTALL), that will make . match also newline characters, and you should also add .* before $ to match the remaining part of the last line. Would you like to see the complete solution, or this is rather enough for you to solve the problem? –  Tadeck Apr 19 '12 at 0:50
    
I've given it a shot...see my edit in my question....I'm doing something wrong. –  llamawithabowlcut Apr 19 '12 at 2:03
    
@user522962: Please see my edit - I have given you full & working solution. The problem with your current solution was that it used greedy qualifiers. For details see re - Regular Expression Syntax documentation‌​, especially characters *?/+?/??. –  Tadeck Apr 19 '12 at 2:17

you can easily make a generator to do this

def re_range(f, re_start, re_end):
    for line in f:
        if re_start.match(line):
            yield line
            break
    for line in f:
        yield line
        if re_end.match(line):
            break

and you can call it like this

import re

re_start = re.compile("now it is")
re_end = re.compile("but now")
with open('in.txt') as f:
    for line in re_range(f, re_start, re_end):
        print line,
share|improve this answer
f = open("yourfile") #that is, the name of your file with extension in quotes
f = f.readlines()

Now f will be a list of each line in the file. f[0] will be the first line, f[1] the second and so on. To grab the third to fifth line you would use f[2:5]

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I just made an edit....if I don't know the line numbers (which I don't), how would I do it? –  llamawithabowlcut Apr 18 '12 at 23:47
    
@user522962 If you're trying to match by string content, run a for loop on the lines within f asking if the string contents meet your desires. I apologize as I don't really know what you're asking for if you don't want to match by content or line number. –  purpleladydragons Apr 18 '12 at 23:53
1  
I'd advise against using readlines(), since it puts the whole file in memory. Depending on the size of your file, this is potentially a problem. –  Charles Menguy Apr 18 '12 at 23:54

Something like that?

import re
valid = False
for line in open("/path/to/file.txt", "r"):
    if re.compile("now it is").match(line):
        valid = True
    if re.compile("but now").match(line):
        valid = False
    if valid:
        print line

Like this your caching just one line at a time, contrary to using readlines() where you would cache the whole file in memory.

This is assuming the regex patterns are unique in your text block, if this is not the case please give more information regarding exactly how you match the start line and the end line.

In case you just need to check the beginning of the line for a match it's even easier:

valid = False
for line in open("/path/to/file.txt", "r"):
    if line.startswith("now it is"):
        valid = True
    if line.startswith("but now"):
        valid = False
    if valid:
        print line
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