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Languages such as Nemerle support the idea of chords. I'd like to know what their practical use is.

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2  
I can see why you ask this question. Googling for "c#", "chord", etc. really isn't very helpful! –  Noldorin Jun 20 '09 at 17:09
    
Well C# doesn't support chords, the Polyphonic version did, but I think that language no longer exists, right? –  Dmitri Nesteruk Jun 20 '09 at 17:35

3 Answers 3

The construct also seems to exist in the language (as well as Polyphonic C#), at least according to Wikipedia.

The primary usage of chords appears to involve database programming (more specifically, join calculus), which is unsurprising given that it is a concurrency construct. More than that, I'm afraid I don't know.

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A chord is used for concurrency. The definition is available here.

The bit you are looking for:

In most languages, including C#, methods in the signature of a class are in bijective correspondence with the code of their implementations -- for each method which is declared, there is a single, distinct definition of what happens when that method is called. In Cω, however, a body may be associated with a set of (synchronous and/or asynchronous) methods. We call such a definition a chord, and a particular method may appear in the header of several chords. The body of a chord can only execute once all the methods in its header have been called. Thus, when a method is called there may be zero, one, or more chords which are enabled:

If no chord is enabled then the method invocation is queued up. If the method is asynchronous, then this simply involves adding the arguments (the contents of the message) to a queue. If the method is synchronous, then the calling thread is blocked. If there is a single enabled chord, then the arguments of the calls involved in the match are de-queued, any blocked thread involved in the match is awakened, and the body runs. When a chord which involves only asynchronous methods runs, then it does so in a new thread. If there are several chords which are enabled then an unspecified one of them is chosen to run. Similarly, if there are multiple calls to a particular method queued up, we do not specify which call will be de-queued when there is a match.

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Try Nemerle Computation Expressions:

https://code.google.com/p/nemerle/source/browse/nemerle/trunk/snippets/ComputationExpressions/

Some examples:

 def upTo (n : int)
  {
    comp enumerable
    {
      mutable i = 0;
      while (i < n)
      {
        i ++;
        yield i
      }
    }
  }

  def manyTimes : IEnumerable [int] =
    comp enumerable
    {
      yieldcomp upTo(2);   // 1 2
      yield 100;           // 100
      yieldcomp upTo(3);   // 1 2 3
      yield 100;           // 100
      yieldcomp upTo(10);  // 1 2 3 .. 10
    }

def fn(n)
  {
    comp async
    {
      if (n < 20)
        returncomp fn(n + 1);
      else
        return n;
    }
  }
  def f(n1, n2)
  {
    comp async
    {
      defcomp n1 = fn(n1);
      defcomp n2 = fn(n2);
      return $"$n1 $n2";
    }
  }

private HttpGet(url : string) : Async[string]
{
  comp async
  {
    def req = WebRequest.Create(url);
    using (defcomp resp = req.AsyncGetResponse())
    using (stream = resp.GetResponseStream())
    using (reader = StreamReader(stream))
      return reader.ReadToEnd();
  }
}

Some more examples here: (Although article in Russian but code in English :) ) http://habrahabr.ru/blogs/programming/108184/

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