Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm writing a grocery cart simulation app

Here is my situation, I want to force a type to execute a method it has defined for itself...

Basically I have an interface

interface IGroceryCart
{
   // Other methods snipped for clarity
   void Checkout(IEnumerable<IGroceryItem> itemsToBuy);
}

Now the IGroceryItem interface looks like this

interface IGroceryItem
{
   // Other methods snipped for clarity
   CheckoutIssues EnsureFreshness();
}    

IGroceryCart and IGroceryItem have concrete implementations obviously, but what I am trying to do is this:

When I call Checkout on a grocery cart, I want all the items that are being checked out to internally call their EnsureFreshness() method and then react accordingly if one or more items had CheckoutIssues

CheckoutIssues is just something like

class CheckoutIssues
{
   string Description {get;set;}
   //etc
}

What would be the best way to implement a way that EnsureFreshness has been called on each grocery item? Or an alternate approach that is better to get these kind of errors? Should I go the custom validator route? Each grocery item may have its own way of checking freshness, milk would be different from Eggs for example, so I have to rely on each individual implementation, but I'd like to force that call on checkout, hope that makes sense.

share|improve this question
1  
As a side note, you may want to rename a few things to make them clearer: I'd change CheckoutIssues to CheckoutIssue (if you need to return multiple issues, return a Collection). Also EnsureFreshness() might be better as GetFreshnessIssues() or the like. –  kad81 Apr 19 '12 at 1:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could just put it in your Checkout method, and add the returned object to some collection to deal with:

List<CheckoutIssues> issues = new List<CheckoutIssues>();
foreach (IGroceryItem item in itemsToBuy) {
    issues.Add(item.EnsureFreshness());
}
share|improve this answer

Well lets say you go to Walmart and add items to the Cart, is it the duty of the Cart to checkout or is it the duty of the employer at counter to checkout?

I feel it is wired to have method Checkout on Shopping Cart. If I were you I would probably take this route.

 interface IGroceryCart
{

   /**void Checkout(IEnumerable<IGroceryItem> itemsToBuy);**/
   void AddItem(IEnumerable<IGroceryItem> itemsToBuy)//I like to add items to Grocery Cart.
}

I should be able to add Item to the GroceryCart.

The second issue is when you add Apples to the cart in Walmart, the apple does not know if it fresh or expired or rotten.

    interface IGroceryItem
    { 
       CheckoutIssues EnsureFreshness(); //I am skeptic about having this method on GroceryItem
    }   

    class GroceryCart:IGroceryCart
    {
       public void AddItem(IEnumerable<IGroceryItem> itemsToBuy)
       {

       }
    }

    class Billing
   {


    public decimal BillItems(GroceryCart cart)
    {
         foreach item in cart
           if(itemIsfresh)
             Bill it.
    } 



     private bool IsItemFresh(GroceryItem item)
     {

     }

  }
share|improve this answer
1  
You're correct in relating the objects to the real world, however I don't think it's practical in this application. The poster stated that the check for freshness will vary for each type of item, and so it probably makes more sense for it to produce this evaluation. This is actually true in the real world: In order to determine if bread is fresh, I look for an absence of mould, and for a soft loaf. Certain fruit, on the other hand, should be firm. Makes more sense to put it in the item class to me. –  kad81 Apr 19 '12 at 2:07
    
Actually you can delegate the whole responsibility to a seperate class. Rather than having it on Item. That way it is easily extendable. –  Sandeep Apr 19 '12 at 2:11

What is wrong with what you have? Why not just iterate through your itemsToBuy and call EnsureFreshness on each? If any errors come back, Checkout could throw an Exception, or it could be changed to return the list of errors, or just the first error.

Does that help?

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah it makes sense, I was just wondering if there was anything more clever I could do or something obvious I was missing –  Priest Apr 19 '12 at 1:54
    
In programming, "clever" is almost always an adjective to be avoided. –  uosɐſ Apr 19 '12 at 1:57
    
You might have itemsToBuy get moved to a field in the concrete implementation, renamed to just "items" or "groceries" - but I figure that's just part of your example's simplification. –  uosɐſ Apr 19 '12 at 1:59

What not having something like that:

public abstract GroceryCart : IGroceryCart
{
    public void Checkout(IEnumerable<IGroceryItem> itemsToBuy)
    {
        foreach (var item in itemsToBuy)
        {
            item.EnsureFreshness();
        }

        this.InternalCheckout(itemsToBuy);
    }

    protected abstract void InternalCheckout(IEnumerable<IGroceryItem> itemsToBuy);
}

Now just inherit from your abstract class rather than implementing the interface. And in your third party classes have a reference to GroceryCart rather than IGroceryCart when you need to enfore that freshness is checked. Where it's not mandatory, continue to use IGroceryCart.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.