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I would like to compile Ruby from source, install it, then move the installation somewhere else.

For example:

ruby-1.9.3-p125$ ./configure --prefix=/tmp/ruby-1.9.3-p125

The problem is that it would seem the --prefix path is hardcoded in the Ruby binary. When I move /tmp/ruby-1.9.3-p125 to say /opt/ruby-1.9.3-p125, the hardcoded paths are present in the installed binaries and scripts.

After moving, I get an error:

<internal:gem_prelude>:1:in `require': cannot load such file -- rubygems.rb (LoadError)
    from <internal:gem_prelude>:1:in `<compiled>'

How can I get around this?

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Why don't you just compile it with the actual prefix you're going to install it to? –  Andrew Marshall Apr 19 '12 at 4:35
    
I have an application that relies on ruby-1.9. I want to package it precompiled with my application. Of course, I will distribute the Ruby source with the application, per the license, but I don't have control over where the user will install the application. Therefore, I would like to configure it in some way that it can be relocated. –  nilweed Apr 19 '12 at 5:13
1  
On that note, please see Distributing Ruby along with application? for why that's not such a good idea anyway. –  Andrew Marshall Apr 19 '12 at 15:00
    
Thanks for the link, Andrew. My application is designed only for Linux x86_64 systems, so I'm not too worried about portability to other platforms. I did find a solution in the answer below- –  nilweed Apr 19 '12 at 15:25
    
What "answer below"? –  Andrew Marshall Apr 19 '12 at 15:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Found that the solution is to use --enable-load-relative when configure'ing.

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1  
Also see this post for a more thorough discussion: yehudakatz.com/2012/06 –  Evan Oct 31 '12 at 3:00
    
can you explain what you mean by configuring? –  kibaekr May 5 '14 at 7:10

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