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I have a class, and I would like to be able to create multiple objects of that class and place them in an array. I did it like so:

    rooms = []
    rooms.append(Object1())
    ...
    rooms.append(Object4())

I then have a dict of functions, and I would like to pass the object to the function. However, I'm encountering some problems..For example, I have a dict:

    dict = {'look': CallLook(rooms[i])}

I'm able to pass it into the function, however; in the function if I try to call an objects method it gives me problems

    def CallLook(current_room)
       current_room.examine()

I'm sure that there has to be a better way to do what I'm trying to do, but I'm new to Python and I haven't seen a clean example on how to do this. Anyone have a good way to implement a list of objects to be passed into functions? All of the objects contain the examine method, but they are objects of different classes. (I'm sorry I didn't say so earlier)

The specific error states: TypeError: 'NoneType' object is not callable

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2  
Instead of making us guess what problems you might be having, it's easier if you explain the problems to us. Better yet, post an error message or undesirable behavior. –  gfortune Apr 19 '12 at 6:52
    
This looks fine assuming that Object1() etc all have the .examine method. Are the instances all supposed the be different classes? –  John La Rooy - AKA gnibbler Apr 19 '12 at 6:54
    
If you get that error then that code is not accurate. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Apr 19 '12 at 6:57
    
In your code, you are creating different objects of different classes. –  Burhan Khalid Apr 19 '12 at 6:57
    
what is the purpose of the dict. ps. don't use dict as a variable name as it shadows the builtin dict –  John La Rooy - AKA gnibbler Apr 19 '12 at 7:00

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Anyone have a good way to implement a list of objects to be passed into functions? All of the objects contain the examine method, but they are objects of different classes. (I'm sorry I didn't say so earlier)

This is Python's plain duck-typing.

class Room:
    def __init__(self, name):
        self.name = name
    def examine(self):
        return "This %s looks clean!" % self.name

class Furniture:
    def __init__(self, name):
        self.name = name
    def examine(self):
        return "This %s looks comfortable..." % self.name

def examination(l):
    for item in l:
        print item.examine()

list_of_objects = [ Room("Living Room"), Furniture("Couch"), 
                    Room("Restrooms"), Furniture("Bed") ]
examination(list_of_objects)

Prints:

This Living Room looks clean!
This Couch looks comfortable...
This Restrooms looks clean!
This Bed looks comfortable...

As for your specific problem: probably you have forgotten to return a value from examine()? (Please post the full error message (including full backtrace).)

I then have a dict of functions, and I would like to pass the object to the function. However, I'm encountering some problems..For example, I have a dict:

my_dict = {'look': CallLook(rooms[i])} # this is no dict of functions

The dict you have created may evaluate to {'look': None} (assuming your examine() doesn't return a value.) Which could explain the error you've observed. If you wanted a dict of functions you needed to put in a callable, not an actual function call, e.g. like this:

my_dict = {'look': CallLook} # this is a dict of functions

if you want to bind the 'look' to a specific room you could redefine CallLook:

def CallLook(current_room)
   return current_room.examine # return the bound examine
my_dict = {'look': CallLook(room[i])} # this is also a dict of functions

Another issue with your code is that you are shadowing the built-in dict() method by naming your local dictionary dict. You shouldn't do this. This yields nasty errors.

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This was the problem. Examine() doesn't return a value. So when I called my_dict = {'look': CallLook} worked fine, but I didn't understand until now that my_dict = {'look': CallLook(rooms[i])} is not a dict of functions. Thanks very much for the explanation –  Chris Harris Apr 19 '12 at 14:37

Assuming you have a class Room the usual way to create a list of instances would be using a list comprehension like this

rooms = [Room() for i in range(num_rooms)]
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Assuming you don't have basic problems (like syntax errors because the code you have pasted is not valid Python), this example shows you how to do what you want:

>>> class Foo():
...    def hello(self):
...        return 'hello'
...
>>> r = [Foo(),Foo(),Foo()]
>>> def call_method(obj):
...    return obj.hello()
...
>>> call_method(r[1])
'hello'
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I think there are some things you may not be getting about this:

dict = {'look': CallLook(rooms[i])}

This creates a dict with just one entry: a key 'look', and a value which is the result of evaluating CallLook(rooms[i]) right at the point of that statement. It also then uses the name dict to store this object, so you can no longer use dict as a constructor in that context.

Now, the error you are getting tells us that rooms[i] is None at that point in the programme.

You don't need CallLook (which is also named non-standardly) - you can just use the expression rooms[i].examine(), or if you want to evaluate the call later rooms[i].examine.

You probably don't need the dict at all.

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Sorry, I made the dict with one entry for an example. I'm new to python and I know very little about the appropriate standards. I need the dict because I have an input function that takes in string commands from the user and associates them with functions –  Chris Harris Apr 19 '12 at 7:25
    
@user1343005 Your dict does not associate keys with functions. Right now, it is associating your keys with the values generated by function calls. –  Marcin Apr 19 '12 at 7:31
    
Oh okay, that makes sense. However, how would you associate it with a function correctly? –  Chris Harris Apr 19 '12 at 7:33
    
@user1343005 Just store the function in the dict. In this case, you probably want to store the unbound method (i.e. the method as taken from the class), and call it on a specific instance. –  Marcin Apr 19 '12 at 8:38

That is not a must, but in some cases, using hasattr() is good... getattr() is another way to get an attribute off an object...

So:

rooms = [Obj1(),Obj2(),Obj3()]


if hasattr(rooms[i], 'examine'):#First check if our object has selected function or attribute...
    getattr(rooms[i], 'examine') #that will just evaluate the function do not call it, and equals to Obj1().examine
    getattr(rooms[i], 'examine')() # By adding () to the end of getattr function, we evalute and then call the function...

You may also pass parameters to examine function like:

getattr(rooms[i], 'examine')(param1, param2)
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I'm not sure of your requirement, but you can use dict to store multiple object of a class. May be this will help,

>>> class c1():
...     print "hi"
...     
hi
>>> c = c1()
>>> c
<__main__.c1 instance at 0x032165F8>

>>> d ={}
>>> for i in range (10):
...     d[i] = c1()
...     
>>> d[0]
<__main__.c1 instance at 0x032166E8>
>>> d[1]
<__main__.c1 instance at 0x032164B8>
>>> 

It will create a object of c1 class and store it in dict. Obviously, in this case you can use list instead of dict.

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