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I have a static class Manager it should adapt between two tiers of logic would it be a bad practice to devide functionalitlies by nesting static classes inside it? I have about two dozen diffrent subjects to manage with 2 -3 functions each. and would like to avoid creating 2 dozen classes for this

I mean use this:

static class Manager
{
    static class Type1
    {
        static void Method1();
        static void Method2();
        static void Method3(); 
    }
    static class Type2
    {
        static void Method4();
        static void Method5();
        static void Method6(); 
    }
    static class Type3
    {
        static void Method7();
        static void Method8();
        static void Method9();
    }
}

instead of:

static class Manager
{
        static void Method1();
        static void Method2();
        static void Method3(); 
        static void Method4();
        static void Method5();
        static void Method6(); 
        static void Method7();
        static void Method8();
        static void Method9();
}

something like namespaces, but inside a class.

share|improve this question
1  
I think the static manager is not good practice itself. May I suggest you to think about the problem in a TDD manner? A static class in the middle tier is difficult to test, especially if it has to mantain state information. –  Gabber Apr 19 '12 at 7:29
    
Why does this code need to be in a “Manager” class? Don't you have some more appropriate place for it? What does the code actually do and what is the difference between the methods? –  svick Apr 19 '12 at 7:31
    
no need to maintain state. it is only an adapter. though yes static is a problemtic thing. –  Nahum Litvin Apr 19 '12 at 7:40
    
What about extension methods in the "adapted" classes? it is problematic anyway, but you can access methods from where you need them not affecting anything else –  Gabber Apr 19 '12 at 7:54
    
@NahumLitvin what is the rule of grouping methods? I.e. why Method1, Method2 and Method3 goes to Type1? –  Sergey Berezovskiy Apr 19 '12 at 8:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are a number of options, if you are about design choices.

First, you can pour everything into a single class which would be terribly hard to debug and mixed several responsibilities.

Second, you can create nested classes, as you also noted, where you have better seperation of concerns / code but still have everything hardcoded and in one big source-code file.

Third, which is much more extendable, you can consider any container pattern you wish. I have listed one below which keeps your classes seperate and more easily testable should you care, as well as swappable.

interface IManagementRole 
{
}

class Dummy1: IManagementRole
{
    public void Method1() { Console.WriteLine("Dummy1.Method1()"); }
    public void Method2() { Console.WriteLine("Dummy1.Method2()"); }
}

class Dummy2: IManagementRole
{
    public void Method3() { Console.WriteLine("Dummy2.Method3()"); }
    public void Method4() { Console.WriteLine("Dummy2.Method4()"); }
}

static class Manager
{
    private static Dictionary<Type, IManagementRole> myTypes = new Dictionary<Type, IManagementRole>();

    static Manager()
    {
        myTypes.Add(typeof(Dummy1), new Dummy1());
        myTypes.Add(typeof(Dummy2), new Dummy2());
    }

    public static T GetManagableType<T>() where T: class
    {
        if (myTypes.ContainsKey(typeof(T)))
        {
            return myTypes[typeof(T)] as T;
        }

        throw new ArgumentException("Type is not a managable type.", "T");
    }
}

class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Manager.GetManagableType<Dummy1>().Method1();
        Manager.GetManagableType<Dummy1>().Method2();
        Manager.GetManagableType<Dummy2>().Method3();

        Console.Write("Press any key to continue . . . ");
        Console.ReadKey(true);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
u misunderstood me. the nested classes are just a way of orgenizing the code. there is no shared interface at all. @ jaapjan I have fixed and extended my example. –  Nahum Litvin Apr 19 '12 at 7:43
    
Answer changed. Have a new look. –  Jaapjan Apr 19 '12 at 8:00

I would say, yes. Doesn't seem a bad design, imo.

Consider also another way of doing this:

You can have a List<Type> list = bew List<Type>{new Type1(), new Type2()..., new TypeN()};

and have a class that picks from this collection an appropriate one for injection. In this way you will avoid have a big class.

share|improve this answer
    
class won't be very big. I rahter avoid having 2 dozen very small classes not to mention much easier to follow. –  Nahum Litvin Apr 19 '12 at 7:38
    
@NahumLitvin: just a matter of design choice –  Tigran Apr 19 '12 at 7:46

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