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There is a simple program below that takes a HUP and continues with execv. The problem is when the execv call is executed, after that the code continues from the places where the HUP comes.I want, after execv the code must exit from main and than start again from the beginning of main.

char* a;
char** args;

void hup_func(){
    printf("aaaa\n");
    if(execv(a,args))
        printf("bbb\n");
}

int main(int argc,char* argv[]){
    signal(SIGHUP,hup_func);
    args=argv;
    a=args[0];
    printf("%s\n",a);
    while(1){
        printf("test\n");
        sleep(10);
     }

   return 0;
}

The name of the program is deneme1. The output of the code is when I sent HUP;

./deneme1
test
test
aaa 
bbbb
test.

But I want it, when I sent HUP, it must start with the start of the main. like that

./deneme1
test
test
aaa
bbb
./deneme1
test
...

I want it to return at the beginning of the main after HUP, not the place where it was before

share|improve this question
    
Umm, so write code to make it do what you want. One way is longjmp. –  David Schwartz Apr 19 '12 at 8:02
    
As you can see, execv() fails. This is asserted by bbbb printed to stdout. And your code & output doesn't match. –  tuxuday Apr 19 '12 at 11:24
    
@barp: There is another problem I've outlined in my answer with blocked signals after the call to execv does complete successfully. See my updated answer for the solution to this issue. –  Jason Apr 19 '12 at 17:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're not sending the correct arguments to execv, and therefore the function is exiting with an error. So you're simply exiting the signal handler rather than overlaying the process with a new copy of the process.

The argument signature for execv is:

int execv(const char *path, char *const argv[]); 

The second argument should be an array of const pointers to char, with the last element being a NULL pointer. The char* a that you're passing for the second argument is not the correct type.

Finally, execv is not considered an asynchronous signal-safe function, where-as it's sister-function, execve is. You should use the latter. The same is also true for any of the printf family of functions ... if you need to write to the terminal, use write instead.

Update: I re-ran your updated code. The program is restarting properly, but the problem is that the signal mask is being inherited from the original process that was overlaid by the call to execv. Since you are running execv from inside a signal-handler, the SIGHUP will be blocked in the overlaid process, and you won't be able to send any other SIGHUP signals to the process. To undo this, you need to unblock the SIGHUP signal using sigprocmask() right after you assign your signal-handler using signal().

For instance, change your main to:

int main(int argc,char* argv[])
{
    sigset_t signal_mask;

    signal(SIGHUP,hup_func);

    //unblock the SIGHUP signal if it's blocked
    sigaddset(&signal_mask, SIGHUP);
    sigprocmask(SIG_UNBLOCK, &signal_mask, NULL);

    args=argv;
    a=args[0];
    printf("%s\n",a);
    while(1){
        printf("test\n");
        sleep(10);
     }

   return 0;
}

I've compiled and run this on Ubuntu 12.04, and it now runs perfectly.

share|improve this answer
    
no there is not problem its true –  barp Apr 19 '12 at 8:16
    
the first argument is an array of char pointers too –  barp Apr 19 '12 at 8:17
    
I'm looking at the signature here ... you're not passing the correct arguments, and if you checked for an error return from execv, you'd see that it's bailing on you. –  Jason Apr 19 '12 at 8:19
    
I added the condition control and edited the code. the output seems true. –  barp Apr 19 '12 at 8:23

The problem is when the execv call is executed, after that the code continues from the places where the HUP comes

There is no error checking in your code, most likely execv() call fails.

Try amending it like:

char** gargv;

void hup_func() {
    execvp(*gargv, gargv);
    abort(); // must never get here
}

int main(int argc,char* argv[]) {
    // ...
    gargv = argv;
    // ...
share|improve this answer

As @Jason pointed, execv is failing. Test yourself with this code.

#include<signal.h>
char* a;
char **args;

void hup_func(){
    printf("receivied SIGHUP\n");
    execv(a,a);
    printf("execv failed\n");
}

int main(int argc,char* argv[]){
    int b =0;
    printf("setting signal handler for SIGHUP\n");
    signal(SIGHUP,hup_func);
    args=argv;
    a=argv[0];
    printf("Before entering while %s\n",a);
    while(1){
        printf("In while %d\n",++b);
        sleep(1);
     }

   return 0;
}

Then replace

   execv(a,a);

with

   execv(a,args);
share|improve this answer
    
it does not matter. you can say the signature is like that. but a null char** can bu equal char*. if you try your code and my code you will see no difference –  barp Apr 19 '12 at 8:29
    
I tried your code. the result is same –  barp Apr 19 '12 at 8:31
    
Please read my response fully. The code as i given will print execv failed as you are passing wrong argument types. Then replace execv(a,a); with execv(a,args); –  tuxuday Apr 19 '12 at 8:38
    
Yes I replaced it. and the result is same.I will edit my question what I do. –  barp Apr 19 '12 at 8:40

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