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Just edited: I have a weird problem with a jQuery function. My function works well on a small jsFiddle on every browser example: http://jsfiddle.net/Ksb2W/72/
but if I want to integrate that function in my html page it is not working on Google Chrome and IE8. On Firefox works great.

Thank you!

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please add your function code here for proper solution –  sam_13 Apr 19 '12 at 9:19
1  
Correction: please post a short self contained example of your problem here for a proper solution. –  spender Apr 19 '12 at 9:20
    
@burebistaruler: if those links were to become stale, this question would too... consider providing everything relevant to the question in the body of your question. –  spender Apr 19 '12 at 9:24
    
or you can check jsFiddle example –  burebistaruler Apr 19 '12 at 9:49
    
Edit the post and put the code into there –  rickyduck Apr 19 '12 at 12:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

From what I can see, your click is not highlighting the correct rows because the tables on your live site had a different layout in your example.

In the example your rows maps 1:1.

On the live site your second table has two extra rows:

<tr class="navigation"> ...
<tr class="headers"> ...

which obviously breaks your order-based matching.

Your hover is broken because, again, your example is different from your live site.

In your example you have:

$(".table").each(function(){          
    $("tr:eq("+row+")",this).addClass("hoverx");
});

but on the live site in focus.js you have:

$("table.grid tbody tr").each(function(){          
      $("tr:eq("+row+")",this).addClass("hoverx");
});

Note how you are looping over the rows in the second case.

Edit

I think using tbody to group the interactive rows is a nice solution to your problem of having additional rows in the second table. You could also simplify your javascript a bit as a result:

Example with second table having more rows

Per requested here's what a solution using not would look like. Note you pretty much have to filter it out everywhere you select a tr.

Example using not and making the minimum amount of changes to the original code

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hmmmmm yes, you have right. Is possible to ignore that tr (navigation,headers)? Or maybe to use that function for all I have into <tbody> </tbody> –  burebistaruler Apr 19 '12 at 12:03
    
@burebistaruler you could exclude them in your selector: $('tr').not('.navigation, .headers').eq(row). Or you could format your HTML differently as you say, and put all the selectable row into their own tbody. –  Henry Apr 19 '12 at 12:06
    
@burebistaruler I have provided an example using not in my edit. Unfortunately I do not have time now to clean up that example, but hopefully the idea behind it is clear. –  Henry Apr 19 '12 at 12:43
    
Thank you very much for your time Henry, and yes your ideea was very helpful. –  burebistaruler Apr 19 '12 at 12:49

Try juggling with td height because from that height you have the difference.

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