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We know that \n is used to feed a new line in JavaScript.
How should I use it for an output (in a for-loop):

str=prompt("Enter any string!");
    for(i=0;i<str.length;i++)
    {
        document.write('\n'+str.charCodeAt(i));
    }   

or

str=prompt("Enter any string!");
    for(i=0;i<str.length;i++)
    {
        document.write('\n'+str.charCodeAt(i));
    }

Neither seems to work.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This has nothing to do with JavaScript. In HTML, all whitespace (including newlines) is collapsed and treated as a single space.

To do a line break in HTML:

  • Use <br>
  • Or organize your text into paragraphs with <p>...</p>, etc.)
  • Or if you're outputting some form of formatted text (like code), you can do that in a <pre>...</pre> element (or any element with the white-space: pre, white-space: pre-wrap, or white-space: pre-line style applied to it).
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I see, what for is \n then? Is it ever used as I did? –  pop stack Apr 19 '12 at 10:14
1  
@popstack: JavaScript is not limited to dealing with HTML; it's a general-purpose language. (Originally not even designed for web browsers, but rather for a web server; but it was then quickly added to Netscape Navigator and the rest is history.) When dealing with other things, \n may be a line break. For instance, even in browsers, alert("Foo\nbar"); shows two lines in the alert box, because the text you give to alert isn't HTML. –  T.J. Crowder Apr 19 '12 at 10:16

when the output is a part of the HTML page use

<br>

to start a New-Line.

And when the output is part of JavaScript elements(Alert Box for example) use the:

\n

escape character.

so if you want the code you wrote in the question to be displayed with every loop-result on a line of its own then you should write it like this:

str=prompt("Enter any string!");
for(i=0;i<str.length;i++)
  {
      document.write("<br>"+str.charCodeAt(i));
  }

BUT if you want(let's say split the contents of the prompt message in two) then it should be written like this:

str=prompt("Enter\nany string!");
for(i=0;i<str.length;i++)
  {
          document.write("<br>"+str.charCodeAt(i));
  }
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If you're writing to the document you'll want document.write('<br/>'+str.charCodeAt(i)); - or to set your output in a <pre> tag (or another element with the a style attribute of white-space:pre).

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@popstack: <br/> is the XHTML version of <br>. Since you're not using XHTML, you would just use <br>. (How do I know you're not using XHTML? Because you're using document.write, which you can't use in XHTML.) –  T.J. Crowder Apr 19 '12 at 10:24
    
you can use either - the self closing <br/> is valid for all doctypes whereas <br> would be invalid for an XHTML doctype –  Mikey Apr 19 '12 at 10:26
1  
@ Mikey: Grr, strikethrough doesn't work in comments. Pretend you see strikethrough as indicated. <s><br/> isn't valid in HTML4 and earlier. Browsers tolerate it, but it's wrong. In HTML5, there's a special parsing case specifically to allow it (because people kept using it incorrectly in HTML documents).</s> I may have to take that back, I just tried the validator telling it to use HTML 4.01 strict, and it let it through. Could have sworn it wasn't valid. –  T.J. Crowder Apr 19 '12 at 10:29
    
And, should I use single quotes or double? Do we have guidelines on that (I have to use HTML 4.01 strict)? –  pop stack Apr 19 '12 at 10:36
    
javascript will accept either " or ' so long as you use the same quote at each end of the string –  Mikey Apr 19 '12 at 10:36

use document.writeln() method .

The writeln() method is identical to the write() method, with the addition of writing a newline character after each statement.

try this

 str=prompt("Enter any string!");
 for(i=0;i<str.length;i++)
 {
    document.writeln(str.charCodeAt(i));
 } 
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