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Is this the right way to use C++11 rvalue-references and move semantics to implement a convenience wrapper for std::reverse()?

template <class BIDirContainer> inline BIDirContainer&& reverse(BIDirContainer a) {
    std::reverse(begin(a), end(a));
    return std::move(a); 
}

The code works in my test case but I am unsure its about performance: should I use && here or is it unneccesary?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would say the right way to do it is to return by value from your function:

template <class BIDirContainer> inline BIDirContainer reverse(BIDirContainer a) {
    std::reverse(begin(a), end(a));
    return a; 
}

and then give BIDirContainer a move constructor if it doesn't have one. Then this kind of expression:

BIDirContainer x = ...;
BIDirContainer backwards{reverse(x)};

should move the contents of the temporary a in your reverse function into backwards.

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So for STL containers (already move constructor support) the right way would be to neither use && nor std::move, right? –  Nordlöw Apr 19 '12 at 12:23
1  
@Nordlöw use neither in your function, only use them in your class if you are implementing a move constructor. If you are using C++11 containers you don't have to do anything. –  juanchopanza Apr 19 '12 at 12:26

If you return by (rvalue) reference then you will get a dangling reference, since a is a local object. Return by value, and everything should "just work".

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Ok. I should still use std::move though right? Thanks. –  Nordlöw Apr 19 '12 at 12:21
    
@Nordlöw no need for move, except perhaps in the implementation of a move constructor if BIDirContainer doesn't have one. See answer below. –  juanchopanza Apr 19 '12 at 12:34
    
In C++11, if you return a local object (such as a in this example) by value then in the first instance the compiler should construct it directly into the return value, and failing that it should use the move constructor if there is one. –  Anthony Williams Apr 19 '12 at 14:52

So if you want to modify the parameter...

template <class BIDirContainer>
inline BIDirContainer& reverse(BIDirContainer& a)
{
    std::reverse(begin(a), end(a));
    return a;
}

If you want to make a reversed copy then:

template <class BIDirContainer>
inline BIDirContainer reverse(BIDirContainer a)
{
    std::reverse(begin(a), end(a));
    return a;
}

The return value of a function is already an rvalue (specifically an "xvalue"). If you pass it to a function that has move semantics, it will be moved - however due to the named return value optimization (NRVO) result in the above may even be constructed in-place (better than move semantics).

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When you are passing by ref, then why do you need to return it ? –  Jagannath Apr 19 '12 at 12:34
    
How does this explain rvalue-references ? –  Jagannath Apr 19 '12 at 12:35
    
@Jagannath: In first version ref is return so you can chain call like ostream. I've added more details. –  Andrew Tomazos Apr 19 '12 at 12:37
    
Yes, you are right about the first version. For the second one though, just taking the parameter by value will be sufficient. –  Jagannath Apr 19 '12 at 12:40

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