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I am newbie to developing in C++ for Windows..

I am trying to produce a struc which will have pointer to other struct...

How is this possible?

struct InitialNode {  
     Node * nextNode; 
     Node * lowerNode;
} InitialNode;

struct Node {  
     Node * nextNode; 
     Node * lowerNode;
     int value;
} Node;

An error is being highlighted at the InitialNode struct where the Node * nextNode; and Node * lowerNode are..

Any ideas?

Thanks a lot beforehand :)

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This isn't specific to Windows, all C++ compilers have the same rules here. They all compile top to bottom, except for class methods (which are always compiled after the class itself) –  MSalters Apr 19 '12 at 12:54
    
@Msalters .. thanks for pointing that one out :) –  cgval Apr 19 '12 at 16:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There are several errors:

First, I'm pretty sure you wanted a typedef. Also, you need to forward-declare Node before InitialNode:

struct Node;
typedef struct InitialNode {  
     Node * nextNode; 
     Node * lowerNode;
} InitialNode;

typedef struct Node {  
     Node * nextNode; 
     Node * lowerNode;
     int value;
} Node;

Your syntax

struct A
{
} A;

attempts to create an object of type A named A. Note that the typedef struct is a C-style declaration and is not needed in C++. You could very well write:

struct Node;
struct InitialNode {  
     Node * nextNode; 
     Node * lowerNode;
};
struct Node {  
     Node * nextNode; 
     Node * lowerNode;
     int value;
};
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typedef is not necessary in this case although it is recommended stackoverflow.com/questions/612328/… –  EdChum Apr 19 '12 at 11:13
1  
@EdChum I can't see where it says it is recommended for C++. In fact there are several answers that state that for C++ it makes no difference. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 19 '12 at 11:16
    
yes you're right but it is still not necessary –  EdChum Apr 19 '12 at 11:18

In c++ an identifier can be used only AFTER it's declared. Try this:

struct Node {  
     Node * nextNode; 
     Node * lowerNode;
     int value;
};

struct InitialNode {  
     Node * nextNode; 
     Node * lowerNode;
} InitialNode;

Defining Node before InitialNode should solve your problem

share|improve this answer
    
@happy_emi.. thanks mate :) –  cgval Apr 19 '12 at 11:18

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