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I am trying parse a map file that is generated by gcc, for function addresses. There is a possible solution here(python), but it's not working for me.

I am trying to understand the solution provided. It has got two complex regular expressions..

m = re.search('^\[([0-9 ]+)\]\s+(.+)\s*$',line )
m = re.search('^([0-9A-Fx]+)\s+([0-9A-Fx]+)\s+(\[([ 0-9]+)\]|\w+)\s+(.*?)\s*$', line)

Can any one explain me what is the RE searching for ?

Is there any other working solution to get function addresses from gcc produced mapfile ?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted
^\[([0-9 ]+)\]\s+(.+)\s*$

^                  start of the line
\[                 literal [
([0-9 ]+)          group of 0-9 or space, one or more times
\]                 literal ]
\s+                one or more spaces
(.+)               group of anything one or moretimes
\s*                zero or more spaces 
$                  end of line


eg: "[5 5 5] blah"

gives:
    group1 = "5 5 5"
    group2 = blah

^([0-9A-Fx]+)\s+([0-9A-Fx]+)\s+(\[([ 0-9]+)\]|\w+)\s+(.*?)\s*$

^                  start of line
([0-9A-Fx]+)       group of chars one or more times
\s+                one or more spaces
([0-9A-Fx]+)       group of chars one or more times
\s+                one or more spaces
(
    \[             literal [
    ([ 0-9]+)      group of char 1 or more times
    \]             literal [
    |              or
    \w+            word char, one or more times
)
\s+                one or more spaces
(.*?)              any char zero or more times, non greedy
\s*                zero or more spaces
$                  end of line
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2  
(It should be noted that the \s* at the end will always match nothing, since the + in (.+) is greedy) –  dbaupp Apr 19 '12 at 11:56

One way to debug Python regular expressions is to use the undocumented re.DEBUG flag when creating a pattern object.

>>> import re
>>> re.compile('^\[([0-9 ]+)\]\s+(.+)\s*$', re.DEBUG)
at at_beginning
literal 91
subpattern 1
  max_repeat 1 65535
    in
      range (48, 57)
      literal 32
literal 93
max_repeat 1 65535
  in
    category category_space
subpattern 2
  max_repeat 1 65535
    any None
max_repeat 0 65535
  in
    category category_space
at at_end
<_sre.SRE_Pattern object at 0x01CE8950>

It's obviously not 100% straightforward to read but it can help if you know a little about how matching works and find the indentation helpful.

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1  
+1 - that's a handy trick. –  Li-aung Yip Apr 19 '12 at 12:01
pattern1 = re.compile (
r"""
^                       # start of string
\[                      # literal [
([0-9 ]+)               # Collection of numbers and spaces
\]                      # literal ]
\s+                     # whitespace
(.+)                    # any string of at least one character
\s*                     # possible whitespace
$                       # end of string
""", re.VERBOSE )

pattern2 = re.compile (
r"""
^                       # Start of string
([0-9A-Fx]+)            # Collection of hexadecimal digits or 'x'
\s+                     # Whitespace
([0-9A-Fx]+)            # Collection of hexadecimal digits or 'x'
\s+                     # Whitespace
(\[([ 0-9]+)\]|\w+)     # A collection of numbers, or space, inside [] brackets
\s+                     # Whitespace
(.*?)                   # Any string
\s*                     # Possible whitespace
$                       # End of string
""", re.VERBOSE)

These are actually quite badly written regular expressions.

I'll bet that the ([0-9A-Fx]+) subgroups are actually meant to match hexadecimal numbers, like 0x1234DEADBEEF. The way they're written, though, they could match absurdities like xxxxxxxxxx as well. 0x[0-9A-F]+ would be more appropriate here.

There's also the use of a non-greedy match (.*?) in the second regex which will be forced to be greedy anyway, since the regex must match an entire line.

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The first one is:

^         start of string
\[        a '['
([0-9 ]+) one or more digits and spaces
\]        a ']'
\s+       whitespace
(.+)      anything
\s*       optional whitespace
$         end of string

Examples:

"[12345] Hello"
"[06 7] \t Foo.Bar!  "

The second one is:

^            start of string
([0-9A-Fx]+) hex digits and x
\s+          whitespace
([0-9A-Fx]+) hex digits and x
\s+          whitespace
(            either:
\[             a '['
([ 0-9]+)      digits and spaces
\]             a ']'
|            or:
\w+            a word
)            end group
\s+          whitespace
(.*?)        optional anything (non-greedy)
\s*          optional whitespace
$            end string

Examples:

"0xF00 0x1234 [89] Foo"
"78x9 023 Foobar "
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Let me give you an invaluable link to figure out these regex expressions.

Click on this

You first regex will be parsed and explained as:

NODE                     EXPLANATION
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  ^                        the beginning of the string
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \[                       '['
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  (                        group and capture to \1:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    [0-9 ]+                  any character of: '0' to '9', ' ' (1 or
                             more times (matching the most amount
                             possible))
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  )                        end of \1
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \]                       ']'
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \s+                      whitespace (\n, \r, \t, \f, and " ") (1 or
                           more times (matching the most amount
                           possible))
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  (                        group and capture to \2:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    .+                       any character except \n (1 or more times
                             (matching the most amount possible))
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  )                        end of \2
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  \s*                      whitespace (\n, \r, \t, \f, and " ") (0 or
                           more times (matching the most amount
                           possible))
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  $                        before an optional \n, and the end of the
                           string

I assume you can figure out how to get the second one parsed.

Cheers.

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