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Assume I have an interface

class I{
public:
    virtual void f(int id)=0;
    virtual void g(int id, float x)=0;
}

I need a proxy class, to do some sort of id to pointer mapping

class Proxy : I
{
    I * i[5];
public:
    void f(int id)
    {
        i[id]->f(id);
    }

    void g(int id, float x)
    {
        i[id]->g(id, x);
    }

}

So when i write

Proxy *p;
p->f(1);

f is called on the object with id=1

there are several such cases and interfaces are rather large. So I don't want to code all the functions in the proxy class. Is there way to do it automatically? maybe using macros, templates, overloading "->" etc.

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Are there many interfaces you write the same proxy for, or many proxy classes for the same interface, or many proxies for many interfaces? –  hansmaad Apr 19 '12 at 13:31
    
it's a bit confusing: it looks like that and instance of I does not know his own index, but it gets to know when his f or g methods are called... why? weird design. I would plan the whole thing with I never knowing his own index. That would make a better sense. –  Lorenzo Pistone Apr 19 '12 at 13:40
    
@hansmaad, many proxies for many interfaces (one-to-one) –  Volkan Sirin Apr 19 '12 at 13:46
1  
I don't think there's a clean solution. My best thought is to differentiate the behavior of the I class, so if one of its object is created with a certain flag, it rather works as a proxy of other instances of itself. You'll have to put a little code, at the beginning of each member function, that checks if the current instance is a proxy, and if so call the same method on the requested instance. That could be done with macros. –  Lorenzo Pistone Apr 19 '12 at 14:19
2  
What's wrong with p->get(i)->f()? –  n.m. Apr 19 '12 at 15:04
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The easy solution is to define an operator-> that returns the pointer to the interface. But this will break your encapsulation since everybody can access your objects directly and you actually don't need your proxy class (you might as well just use a std::map).

Alternative you could do something like

template <typename Interface>
class Proxy
{
   Interface* interfaces[5];
public:
  template <typename F, typename... Params>
  auto operator()(F f, const int id,  Params... parameters)
           -> decltype((interfaces[id]->*f)(id, parameters...))
  { return (interfaces[id]->*f)(id, parameters...); }
};

It heavily relies on C++11 features so it might not compile with your compiler.

First it uses the Variadic templates. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Variadic_Templates for more information.

Next it uses decl_type. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decltype for more information.

You have to use it like this:

  Proxy<I> p;
  ...

  p(&I::f,1);
  p(&I::g,3, 1.);
share|improve this answer
    
woow! we don't have a C++11 compatible compiler but, this is just beautiful! Thank you! –  Volkan Sirin Apr 20 '12 at 15:02
    
Can you then accept the answer :-) –  BertR Apr 20 '12 at 15:17
    
well, i guess this is the best i can get :) –  Volkan Sirin Apr 20 '12 at 15:19
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I don't know if this is suitable for you, but you could take care of this using pointers to functions...

ie.

#include <stdio.h>

typedef void (*f)(int);

void f1(int a)
{
    printf("f1: %d\n", a);
}
void f2(int a)
{
    printf("f2: %d\n", a);
}
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    f array[5] = {NULL}; // create array of pointers
    array[0] = f1; // assign different functions on them
    array[1] = f2; // -||-

    array[0](10); // call them
    array[1](12);

    // and you end up with something like "array[i]();" in your proxy class...
}
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