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I'm writing a library/utility I'm going to be using for verification. I'll have a set of elements and a system-under-test that consumes them in some order. The set represents all possible inputs, and the system will receive a finite sequence of those elements.

As the set of finite sequences will be infinite I'm not looking to calculate all sequences for a set, but instead envision using a python generator to accomplish the following:

def seq(s): # s is a set
  length = 0
  nth = 0
  # r = calculate nth sequence of length
  # if there are no more sequences of length, length += 1
  # else n += 1, yield r

I'll eventually extend this to injective and bijective sequences, but for now elements of the set can appear any number of times.

Are generators the best way to approach this? Does using a generator like this eliminate any simplicity gained from recursion? Can anyone point me toward any itertools (or other modules) short cuts that might help me?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It sounds like you're looking for itertools.product. I believe this will do what you're asking:

def seq(s):
    length = 1
    while True:
        for p in itertools.product(s, repeat=length):
            yield p
        length += 1

Now you can do things like this:

>>> zip(range(10), seq(set((1, 2, 3))))
[(0, (1,)), (1, (2,)), (2, (3,)), (3, (1, 1)), (4, (1, 2)), 
 (5, (1, 3)), (6, (2, 1)), (7, (2, 2)), (8, (2, 3)), (9, (3, 1))]

Or this:

>>> test_seq = itertools.izip(itertools.count(), seq(set((1, 2, 3))))
>>> for i in range(10):
...     next(test_seq)
... 
(0, (1,))
(1, (2,))
(2, (3,))
(3, (1, 1))
(4, (1, 2))
(5, (1, 3))
(6, (2, 1))
(7, (2, 2))
(8, (2, 3))
(9, (3, 1))

This can also be compressed further, using other itertools:

>>> from itertools import chain, product, count
>>> s = set((1, 2, 3))
>>> test_seq = chain.from_iterable(product(s, repeat=n) for n in count(1))
>>> zip(range(10), test_seq)
[(0, (1,)), (1, (2,)), (2, (3,)), (3, (1, 1)), (4, (1, 2)), (5, (1, 3)), 
 (6, (2, 1)), (7, (2, 2)), (8, (2, 3)), (9, (3, 1))]
share|improve this answer
    
This looks good, and I guess I'd use combinations_with_replacement(,) to allow for repetition in the sequences? –  John Carter Apr 19 '12 at 14:32
    
@JohnCarter, well, the above does allow for repetition in the sequences. The difference is that with the n-dimensional cartesian product used above, order matters; (1, 1, 2) and (1, 2, 1) are both generated. If you don't want that, then combinations_with_replacement is the way to go. –  senderle Apr 19 '12 at 14:53
    
Right. Thanks for clarifying. –  John Carter Apr 19 '12 at 15:27

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