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In class we usually declare global variables and local variables. I have most of the time seen declaring global variables, setters ,getters. Are these essential everytime?Is it ok if I can implement it without using those things?

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1  
They do different things. Which is better? A car or a train? –  SLaks Apr 19 '12 at 13:52
1  
@SLaks, clearly a bear is superior! –  Jakub Apr 19 '12 at 13:54
    
Just use the right tool for the job. –  BalusC Apr 19 '12 at 13:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Generally you should always try to reduce the scope of visibility of variables, methods, classes etc.

So, if you need some variable that is used in one call sequence use local variable and method arguments to pass its value from method to method. For example I have 2 methods foo() and bar() while foo calls bar:

public void foo() {
    bar();
}
private void bar() {
}

Let's say both work on the same string appending to it some suffixes. You can use local variable as in the following example:

public String foo(String s) {
    s += "foo1"
    bar(s);
    s += "foo2"
    return s;
}
private String bar(String s) {
    s += "bar1"
    return s;
}

Or class level variable:

private String s;

public String foo() {
    s += "foo1"
    bar();
    s += "foo2"
    return s;
}
private String bar() {
    s += "bar1"
    return s;
}

The first way is better because:

  1. it is encapsulated. No-one knows the detail of implementation. No-one can affect it from outside.
  2. It is easier readable: you do not have to travel back and forward into your code to understand what objects participate in the implementation.
  3. It is thread-safe without any extra efforts like synchronized blocks or atomic variable because it never uses object level variables.

The second implementation is not encapsulated: one can add code that changes the object state and affects on the next call of foo(). You have to go back and forward in you class to understand both algorithm and what variables are affected by algorithm. It is not thread-safe. Two concurrent threads running the same code may compete on changing the same variable.

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I'm guessing that you are defining "global variable" as a member field variable (defined outside the context of a method). It is best to use the mutators (setters) and accessors (getters) when using member fields to allow you to change your implementation easier. One good example would be that if you are checking for conditions around a field when you get or set the variable state you can encapsulate the change in one location rather than spread across each time you use it.

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By global variables you mean class member fields? If variable is only used within the scope of a method, then it should be local. If variable is essentially carrying any state information for the whole class instance - it should be declared as class member field (with setters and getters - if it's required to give access to these fields to other classes).

Good summary on Java classes is here: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/summaryclasses.html

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-1. Don't provide a getter if it's not needed. And even more important: don't provide a setter if not needed, and only provide it if it makes sense to modify the property. –  JB Nizet Apr 19 '12 at 13:58
    
@JBNizet minus-one me by all means, since setters and getters were the main point of my answer (they weren't!) –  maksimov Apr 19 '12 at 14:03
    
I would un-minus you if you removed the last part of your answer, between parentheses. This leads to think that every field must always have a getter and a setter, which is a BIG mistake that many newbies do. –  JB Nizet Apr 19 '12 at 14:05
    
@JBNizet Point taken. Edited. –  maksimov Apr 19 '12 at 14:11

There is no global variable in Java.

A field should only exist if it is a property of the object. It should not be used, for example, to store intermediate results between two method calls of the object.

Getters should only be defined if the outside world needs to access the information. If it doesn't need to, don't define a getter. The more private state is, the best it is because it allows the class to eveolve without impacting the other classes.

A setter should only be modified if the modification of the field is needed, and if it makes sense to modify this field in isolation to the other ones.

Good rules:

  • Less state is better than more state
  • Immutable state is better than mutable state
  • A method should always bring an object from a stable consistent state to another stable consistent state.
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