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I've been looking for a way to get the terminal width from within my C program. What I keep coming up with is something along the lines of:

#include <sys/ioctl.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main (void)
{
    struct ttysize ts;
    ioctl(0, TIOCGSIZE, &ts);

    printf ("lines %d\n", ts.ts_lines);
    printf ("columns %d\n", ts.ts_cols);
}

But everytime I try that I get

austin@:~$ gcc test.c -o test
test.c: In function ‘main’:
test.c:6: error: storage size of ‘ts’ isn’t known
test.c:7: error: ‘TIOCGSIZE’ undeclared (first use in this function)
test.c:7: error: (Each undeclared identifier is reported only once
test.c:7: error: for each function it appears in.)

Is this the best way to do this, or is there a better way? If not how can I get this to work?

EDIT: fixed code is

#include <sys/ioctl.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main (void)
{
    struct winsize w;
    ioctl(0, TIOCGWINSZ, &w);

    printf ("lines %d\n", w.ws_row);
    printf ("columns %d\n", w.ws_col);
    return 0;
}
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6 Answers

up vote 45 down vote accepted

Have you considered using getenv() ? It allows you to get the system's environment variables which contain the terminals columns and lines.

Alternatively using your method, if you want to see what the kernel sees as the terminal size (better in case terminal is resized), you would need to use TIOCGWINSZ, as opposed to your TIOCGSIZE, like so:

struct winsize w;
ioctl(STDOUT_FILENO, TIOCGWINSZ, &w);

and the full code:

#include <sys/ioctl.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main (int argc, char **argv)
{
    struct winsize w;
    ioctl(STDOUT_FILENO, TIOCGWINSZ, &w);

    printf ("lines %d\n", w.ws_row);
    printf ("columns %d\n", w.ws_col);
    return 0;  // make sure your main returns int
}
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3  
yeah but the term width is not an environmental variable, its static to the term. –  austin Jun 21 '09 at 1:42
1  
It doesn't provide you the current terminal size, if someone resizes the terminal during the program's execution. –  Chris Jester-Young Jun 21 '09 at 1:42
    
yeah, was adding that :) –  John T Jun 21 '09 at 1:43
    
had to fix the code a bit but yeah, thanks –  austin Jun 21 '09 at 2:01
2  
You'll need to #include <unistd.h> for STDOUT_FILENO. –  Joey Adams Feb 22 '11 at 22:57
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This example is a bit on the lengthy side, but I believe it's the most portable way of detecting the terminal dimensions. This also handles resize events.

As tim and rlbond suggests, I'm using ncurses. It guarantees a great improvement in terminal compatability as compared to reading environment variables directly.

#include <ncurses.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <signal.h>

// SIGWINCH is called when the window is resized.
void handle_winch(int sig){
  signal(SIGWINCH, SIG_IGN);

  // Reinitialize the window to update data structures.
  endwin();
  initscr();
  refresh();
  clear();

  char tmp[128];
  sprintf(tmp, "%dx%d", COLS, LINES);

  // Approximate the center
  int x = COLS / 2 - strlen(tmp) / 2;
  int y = LINES / 2 - 1;

  mvaddstr(y, x, tmp);
  refresh();

  signal(SIGWINCH, handle_winch);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
  initscr();
  // COLS/LINES are now set

  signal(SIGWINCH, handle_winch);

  while(getch() != 27){
    /* Nada */
  }

  endwin();

  return(0);
}
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2  
But is it really safe to call initscr and endwin from a signal handler? They're at least not listed among the async-signal-safe APIs in man 7 signal –  nav Aug 6 '13 at 18:16
1  
That's a good point @nav, I've never thought of that! Would a better solution perhaps be to have the signal handler raise a flag, and then perform the rest of the operations in the main loop? –  gamen Oct 3 '13 at 9:55
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#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <termcap.h>
#include <error.h>

static char termbuf[2048];

int main(void)
{
    char *termtype = getenv("TERM");

    if (tgetent(termbuf, termtype) < 0) {
        error(EXIT_FAILURE, 0, "Could not access the termcap data base.\n");
    }

    int lines = tgetnum("li");
    int columns = tgetnum("co");
    printf("lines = %d; columns = %d.\n", lines, columns);
    return 0;
}

Needs to be compiled with -ltermcap . There is a lot of other useful information you can get using termcap. Check the termcap manual using info termcap for more details.

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You can compile it with -lcurses too. –  Kambus Apr 19 '11 at 10:12
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If you have ncurses installed and are using it, you can use getmaxyx() to find the dimensions of the terminal.

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Yes, and do note that the Y comes first and then the X. –  Daniel Mar 4 at 9:59
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Here are the function calls for the already suggested environmental variable thing:

int lines = atoi(getenv("LINES"));
int columns = atoi(getenv("COLUMNS"));
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3  
Environment variables are not reliable. These values are set by the shell, so they are not guaranteed to exist. Also, they won't be up to date if the user changes the terminal size. –  Juliano Jun 21 '09 at 2:20
    
Many shells establish a handler for the SIGWINCH signal, so they can keep the variables up to date (they also need it so they'll do proper line wrapping in the input editor). –  Barmar Jul 8 at 16:11
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Assuming you are on Linux, I think you want to use the ncurses library instead. I am pretty sure the ttysize stuff you have is not in stdlib.

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well, what i'm doing isn't really worth setting up ncurses for –  austin Jun 21 '09 at 1:42
    
ncurses is not in stdlib either. Both are standardized in POSIX, but the ioctl way is simpler and cleaner, because you don't have to initialize curses, etc. –  Gandaro May 3 at 22:17
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