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Why does GCC not warn me when I forget to specify the return type of a interface function? For me this behavior seams unexpected. What do you say to this?

This is the test-program (uncoment Line 6 and it works as it should):

program returntest
implicit none
    interface
    function givehalf(Y)
      double precision :: Y
      !double precision :: givehalf !<-- Uncomment this line
    end function givehalf
    end interface
    double precision :: temp

temp=givehalf(5.151515d0)
print*, 'result=   ',temp

end program returntest

function givehalf(Y)
    implicit none
    double precision :: Y
    double precision :: givehalf

    print*, 'Y=        ',Y
    givehalf=Y/2.0d0
    print*, 'return Y/2',givehalf

    return
end function givehalf

The result is this:

user@bapf028dl:/media/disk> gfortran44 -Wall return-test.f90
user@bapf028dl:/media/disk> ./a.out
  Y=           5.1515149999999998     
  return Y/2   2.5757574999999999     
  result=     -1.0579199790954590     
user@bapf028dl:/media/disk> ifort return-test.f90
user@bapf028dl:/media/disk> ./a.out 
  Y=           5.15151500000000     
  return Y/2   2.57575750000000     
  result=      2.57575750350952 
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is not a bug. The interface body inside an interface block forms a separate scope, so you should include an implicit none statement there to prevent yourself from making such errors. Without it the implicit typing rules are in effect, so the function is expected to return a real.

interface
    function givehalf(Y)
        implicit none                 !<-- now you should get an error during compilation
        double precision :: Y
        !double precision :: givehalf !<-- Uncomment this line
    end function givehalf
end interface
share|improve this answer
    
You are right with the separate scope. Aren't the compilers that refuse to compile it (both my recent ones) another mistake then? They complain about the interface block not agree with the actual definition. Compilers should not call an error in a conforming program, only a warning I think. I am not sure what standard says in this situations, because a function should be a separate compilation unit, being it in the same file or not. –  Vladimir F Apr 19 '12 at 19:15
    
@VladimirF: Some (most?) compilers are not in strict mode by default. You have to use a flag to explicitly tell them not to allow things like extensions or certain non-conforming programs. –  eriktous Apr 19 '12 at 23:08
    
Of course, but I am not sure, if thes isn't an oposite case, if I get the problem right. –  Vladimir F Apr 20 '12 at 5:48
    
@VladimirF: What I meant was that compilers may by default perform some interprocedural checking between program units that are in one file (which is not required by the standard), but with the possibility to turn this off with a flag. I have tried now myself, but I can't get gfortran to ignore the mismatch either, unless I put the function in a separate file. This checking is probably a good thing, but still odd. –  eriktous Apr 20 '12 at 11:28
    
Ok thank you... I will use the "implicit none" statement more thoroughly to avoid future issues. I agree to still find that behavior puzzling –  AIFeuer Apr 23 '12 at 8:58

edit: It is really a bug. It gives a type error in gfortran 4.6 and 4.7.

Also I would recommend you to use a module for your functions. You have only one place to change.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for this info. I could not test it on later gfortran versions. Now I have another reason to bother my admin ;-) –  AIFeuer Apr 23 '12 at 8:52

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