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I see objects in JavaScript organized most commonly in the below two fashions. Could someone please explain the difference and the benefits between the two? Are there cases where one is more appropriate to the other?

Really appreciate any clarification. Thanks a lot!

First:

   var SomeObject;

    SomeObject = (function() {

     function SomeObject() {}

         SomeObject.prototype.doSomething: function() {

         },
         SomeObject.prototype.doSomethingElse: function() {

         }

    })();

Second:

SomeObject = function() {

 SomeObject.prototype.doSomething: function() {

 },
 SomeObject.prototype.doSomethingElse: function() {

 }

}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Both of those examples are incorrect. I think you meant:

First:

var SomeObject;
SomeObject = (function() {

    function SomeObject() {
    }

    SomeObject.prototype.doSomething = function() {
    };

    SomeObject.prototype.doSomethingElse = function() {
    };

    return SomeObject;

})();

(Note the return at the end of the anonymous function, the use of = rather than :, and the semicolons to complete the function assignments.)

Or possibly you meant:

function SomeObject() {
}

SomeObject.prototype.doSomething = function() {
};

SomeObject.prototype.doSomethingElse = function() {
};

(No anonymous enclosing function.)

Second:

function SomeObject() {
}
SomeObject.prototype = {

    doSomething: function() {
    },
    doSomethingElse: function() {
    }
};

(Note that the assignment to the prototype is outside the SomeObject function; here, we use : because we're inside an object initializer. And again we have the ; at the end to complete the assignment statement.)

If I'm correct, there's very little difference between them. Both of them create a SomeObject constructor function and add anonymous functions to its prototype. The second version replaces the SomeObject constructor function's prototype with a completely new object (which I do not recommend), where the first one just augments the prototype that the SomeObject constructor function already has.

A more useful form is this:

var SomeObject;
SomeObject = (function() {

    function SomeObject() {
    }

    SomeObject.prototype.doSomething = doSomething;
    function doSomething() {

    }

    SomeObject.prototype.doSomethingElse = doSomethingElse;
    function doSomethingElse()
    }

    return SomeObject;

})();

There, the functions we assign to doSomething and doSomethingElse have names, which is useful when you're walking through code in a debugger (they're shown in call stacks, lists of breakpoints, etc.). The anonymous function wrapping everything is there so that the doSomething and doSomethingElse names don't pollute the enclosing namespace. More: Anonymouses anonymous

Some of us take it further:

var SomeObject;
SomeObject = (function() {
    var p = SomeObject.prototype;

    function SomeObject() {
    }

    p.doSomething = SomeObject$doSomething;
    function SomeObject$doSomething() {

    }

    p.doSomethingElse = SomeObject$doSomethingElse;
    function SomeObject$doSomethingElse()
    }

    return SomeObject;

})();

...so that not only do we see doSomething, but SomeObject$doSomething in the lists. Sometimes that can get in the way, though, it's a style choice. (Also note I used the anonymous function to enclose an alias for SomeObject.prototype, to make for less typing.)

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Thanks alot, that's a great answer. You mention debugging, is there an IDE or debugger you recommend for working with JS? –  dave Apr 19 '12 at 15:01
    
@dave: Honestly, Chrome's excellent built-in Developer Tools are about all I've needed for most JS debugging. –  JackieChiles Apr 19 '12 at 15:12
    
@dave: I mean the tools built into most browsers these days (I mostly use Chrome's Dev Tools, or Firefox+Firebug). BTW, if you're interested in the subject of constructor functions, building OOP hierarchies in JavaScript, etc., you might find my Lineage script interesting. It makes some of this easier, while trying to avoid being complex. –  T.J. Crowder Apr 19 '12 at 15:29
    
@T.J.Crowder & JackieChiles - Thanks a lot, I always forget you can do more than just console in Developer Tools. I will definitely checkout the Lineage script - thanks again! –  dave Apr 19 '12 at 15:52

First off, both snippets will not parse for me (Chrome) - you should use = in place of :. That said, my humble opinion follows.

The latter snippet is slightly strange, because you actually define methods on SomeObject's prototype at the time of the object construction, rather than at the parse time. Thus, if you have re-defined some method on SomeObject.prototype, it will get reverted to the original version once a new object is constructed. This may result in unexpected behavior for existing objects of this type.

The former one looks fine, except that the (function { ...} ())() wrapper may not be necessary. You can declare just:

function SomeObject() {}
SomeObject.prototype.doSomething = function() {}
SomeObject.prototype.doSomethingElse = function() {}
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The actual difference between first and second in your questions is just:

var o = (function () {})();  # call this (A)

and

var o = function () {};  # call this (B)

Unfortunately, neither of the examples that you gave are written correctly and, while I don't think either will actually give an error at parse-time, both will break in interesting ways when you try to do things with the result.

To give you an answer about the difference between (A) and (B), (A) is the immediate function application pattern. The JavaScript Patterns book has a good discussion, which I recommend.

The actual problems in your code have been explained by other people while I was writing this. In particular T.J. Crowder points out important things.

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