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Consider the following command which runs flawlessly using bash:

java -classpath bin:lib/* FunctionalTests.TestRunner

The classes are in bin, jars are in lib, main() is in bin/FunctionalTests/TestRunner:

.
├── bin
├── lib
│   ├── commons-collections-3.2.1.jar
│   ├── commons-httpclient-3.1.jar
│   ├── commons-io-2.1.jar
│   ├── commons-lang-2.4.jar
│   ├── commons-logging-1.1.1.jar
│   └── ...
└── src

When the same command runs with zsh, the output is:

zsh: no matches found: ./bin:./lib/*

Any ideas?

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Are the bin and lib folders subdirectories of your current directory? –  Colin D Apr 19 '12 at 14:31
    
Yes - I'll add the dir structure. –  Adam Matan Apr 19 '12 at 14:31
    
Based on this post, it looks like zsh has some wierd glob behavior unix.stackexchange.com/questions/5572/… –  Colin D Apr 19 '12 at 14:35
    
@ColinD I can’t call “don’t launch command if pattern match failed” “weird”. It is “explicit is better then implicit”: if you don’t need globbing, do escape globbing characters. If you do need globbing, use glob characters, but prepare to errors if globbing fails. You can use *(N) to make zsh remove pattern if it fails ((N) sets option NULL_GLOB for current pattern). And, of course, you can use options to make zsh behave just as weird as POSIX shells. –  ZyX Apr 19 '12 at 18:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It boils down to another pair of quotes:

java -classpath "bin:lib/*" FunctionalTests.TestRunner

Hope it helps someone in the future.

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3  
Zsh treats nonmatching fileglobs as errors, bash returns them as they are. So echo *nosuchfile is error in zsh but it prints "*nosuchfile" in bash. Zsh has an option to change this behavior. –  yazu Apr 19 '12 at 14:42
1  
And bash has an option to be like zsh, too: shopt -s failglob. –  Sorpigal Apr 19 '12 at 17:13
    
The problem with this seems to be that zsh does not expand environment variables when they are inside the quote. So this does not work: java -cp "$M2_REPO/com/h2database/h2/1.3.159/h2*.jar:$M2_REPO/org/liquibase/liquibase-cor‌​e/3.1.1/*.jar" liquibase.integration.commandline.Main –  jbandi Feb 1 '14 at 11:44

Try to use something like this to add every .jar in the classpath:

CP=bin
for i in lib/*.jar
do
  CP=$CP:${i}               
done
java -classpath $CP FunctionalTests.TestRunner
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1  
why are you using ls instead of for i in lib/*.jar? mywiki.wooledge.org/ParsingLs –  jordanm Apr 19 '12 at 20:14
    
You are right, this solution is better, I'm fixing my post, thanks a lot –  Teg Apr 20 '12 at 7:05

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