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I am revising for a software testing exam. One of the questions gives this method and asks to identify the fault as well as produce a test case (if one exists) which does not execute the fault.

Here is the code:

public static int oddOrPos(int[] x) {
  //Effects: if x==null throw NullPointerException
  // else return the number of elements in x that
  // are either odd or positive (or both)
  int count = 0;
  for (int i = 1; i < x.length; i++)
  {
    if (x[i]%2 == 0 || x[i] > 0)
    { 
      count++;
    }
  }
  return count;
}

I have identified two problems. One being that i is initialised to 1 in the for loop so x[0] doesn't get tested. Also x[i] % 2 == 0 should be x[i] != 0

Are these problems faults or errors? I ask this because the question makes it appear that there is only one fault.

Also, I assume that because the for loop will always be executed, there is no test case which will not execute the fault.

share|improve this question
    
As for x[i] % 2 == 0 see the other answers. You're right however, i = 1 would return 0 for one-element arrays even if you change the condition to x[i] % 2 == 1. – Thomas Apr 19 '12 at 14:42
up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you want to detect odd negative values you'll have to look for -1 and not for 0 as it's done right now.

For odd positive values it will be 1. So basically you want anything but 0.

The % operator is a remainder operator, not really a modulo operator, it returns a negative number if the first given number is negative:

class Test1 {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int a = 5 % 3;  // 2
        int b = 5 / 3;  // 1
        System.out.println("5%3 produces " + a +
                " (note that 5/3 produces " + b + ")");

        int c = 5 % (-3);  // 2
        int d = 5 / (-3);  // -1
        System.out.println("5%(-3) produces " + c +
                " (note that 5/(-3) produces " + d + ")");

        int e = (-5) % 3;  // -2
        int f = (-5) / 3;  // -1
        System.out.println("(-5)%3 produces " + e +
                " (note that (-5)/3 produces " + f + ")");

        int g = (-5) % (-3);  // -2
        int h = (-5) / (-3);  // 1
        System.out.println("(-5)%(-3) produces " + g +
                " (note that (-5)/(-3) produces " + h + ")");
    }
}

Another "small" fault is the way the condition is done. Instead of checking for odd or positive, looking for positive or odd will be slightly faster. It's only because it's easier to check if a number is positive or not than getting its remainder.


Resources:

share|improve this answer

Actually x[i] % 2 == 0 should be x[i] % 2 != 0 (if we want to detect odd values along with the positive ones. The existing code will detect even values instead).

The test case is just { -2 } - this element is even and negative, so should not get counted, and the method will return 0 even though it is faulty. { 1 } will also give 0, which is wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
Nope, it doesn't work quite like that with the remained operator, see my answer. – Colin Hebert Apr 19 '12 at 14:46
    
Correct, I forgot about negatives. Fixing. – Alexander Pavlov Apr 19 '12 at 14:48
    
but in your test case {2}, it it even, so shouldn't get counted but it is positive which should increase the count so the method would return 1 would it not? – sam Apr 19 '12 at 14:55
    
My bad, I forgot about positives when writing the core of the answer. Hope it is fixed in full now. – Alexander Pavlov Apr 19 '12 at 14:57
    
Am I right in assuming that because the for loop always executes, there cannot be a test case which does NOT execute the fault? – sam Apr 19 '12 at 15:05

The major thing here is that your for loop is starting at 1, and it should start at 0. You will always miss the first element of the array. Also x[i]%2 == 0 returns true for even numbers, not odd. So change that to x[i]%2 != 0.

public class test{

public static void main(String[] args){
int[] x = {3, 5, -1, -14}

if( 3 == oddOrPos(x)){
    System.out.println("Working");
else
    System.out.println("Test Fail");

}
public static int oddOrPos(int[] x) {
  //Effects: if x==null throw NullPointerException
  // else return the number of elements in x that
 // are either odd or positive (or both)
 int count = 0;
 for (int i = 0; i < x.length; i++)
 {
   if (x[i]%2 != 0 || x[i] > 0)
{ 
  count++;
}
 }
      return count;
}
}
share|improve this answer

As I understand it, you are right in your assumption. The first position of the array should be tested, hence the i[0] you pointed out.

However, x[i]%2 == 0 should instead be x[i]%2 == 1 for an odd number.

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