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I have a web service which receive a string.

This string contains multiple keys => values which are concatenated with the character '+'.

I must validate each value ("required", "not empty"), and assign each to a variable with the same name.

Here is how I build the Dictionary from the string :

string firstname;
string lastname;
string amount;

string request = "firstname=foo+lastname=bar+amout=100.58";

Dictionary<string, string> arguments = new Dictionary<string, string>();

request.Split('+').ToList<string>().ForEach(p =>
{
    string[] tmp = p.Split('=');

    if (tmp.Length == 2)
        arguments.Add(tmp[0], tmp[1]);
});

// Validate and assign : How I do with one value : (I must find a better way)
bool isValid = true;

// check "firstname"
if(arguments.ContainsKey("firstname") && string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(arguments["firstname"]) == false)
{
    firstname = arguments["firstname"];
}
else
{
    isValid = false;
    Logger.Write("Invalid argument : firstname");
}

// Do this for about 20 arguments, it becomes huge...

if(isValid)
{
    Console.WriteLine(firstname); // Displays foo
    Console.WriteLine(lastname); // Displays bar
    Console.WriteLine(amout); // Displays 100.58
}

Thanks, and sorry for spelling mistakes, I'm French.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by casperOne Apr 20 '12 at 14:40

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
hm.. what is a problem actually ? –  Tigran Apr 19 '12 at 14:35
    
What do you want to valid? –  Mitja Bonca Apr 19 '12 at 14:36
    
For example, I can't figured out how to check if firstname exists in the dictionary, if it is not empty, and how to fill the variable "firstname" with the dictionnary value. In facts, there is about 20 arguments and it become very huge to validate each. –  AsKaiser-FR Apr 19 '12 at 14:42
    
Your string can contain duplicate key values? –  asawyer Apr 19 '12 at 14:45
    
I edited my question and added details. @asawyer : I can allow duplicate key values in the string –  AsKaiser-FR Apr 19 '12 at 14:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think you want something like this, but since you didn't acutally ask a question I'm just guessing:

request.Split('+').ToList<string>().ForEach(p =>
{
    string[] tmp = p.Split('=');

    if (tmp.Length == 2 && !string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(tmp[1]))
    {
        // edit - if your string can have duplicates, use
        // Dictionary<U,K>.ContainsKey(U) to check before adding
        var key = tmp[0];
        var value = tmp[1];

        if(!arguments.ContainsKey(key))
        {
            arguments.Add(key, value);
        }
        else
        {
            //overwrite with new value
            //could also maybe throw on duplicate or some other behavior.
            arguents[key]=value; 
        }
    }
    else
        throw InvalidOperationException("Bad dictionary string value");
});

Also, I would question the use of ToList->ForEach if this was in front of me in a code review. You want to avoid side effects in Linq, I would write it with a traditional foreach like:

var itemValues = request.Split('+');
foreach(var item in itemValues)
{
    string[] tmp = item.Split('=');

    if (tmp.Length == 2 && !string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(tmp[1]))
        arguments.Add(tmp[0], tmp[1]);
    else
        throw InvalidOperationException("Bad dictionary string value");
});



// Validate and assign
//read values from the dictionary
//use ContainsKey to check for exist first if needed

Console.WriteLine(arguments["firstname"]); // Displays foo
Console.WriteLine(arguments["lastname"]); // Displays foo
Console.WriteLine(arguments["amout"]); // Displays 100.58

Edit 2 - You should encapsulate the logic in a method:

private string TryGetValue(IDictionary<string,string> dict,string key)
{
    string value = null;
    if(dict.ContainsKey(key) && !string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(dict[key]))
    {
        value = dict[key];
    }
    else
    {
        Logger.Write("Invalid argument : " + key);
    }
    return value;
}

Now you can say:

string firstName = TryGetValue(arguments,"firstname");
string lastName= TryGetValue(arguments,"lastName");
string amount = TryGetValue(arguments,"amount");

bool isValid = firstName!=null && lastName != null && amount != null;

if(isValid)
{
    Console.WriteLine(firstName ); // Displays foo
    Console.WriteLine(lastName); // Displays bar
    Console.WriteLine(amout); // Displays 100.58
}

TryGetValue would make an excellent extension method:

public static class Extensions
{
    public static string TryGetValue(this IDictionary<string,string> dict, string key)
    {
        string value = null;
        if(dict.ContainsKey(key) && !string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(dict[key]))
        {
            value = dict[key];
        }
        else
        {
            Logger.Write("Invalid argument : " + key);
        }
        return value;
    }

}

Now the calling code would look like:

string firstName = arguments.TryGetValue("firstname");
string lastName= arguments.TryGetValue("lastname");
string amount = arguments.TryGetValue("amount");

Last edit - A note on extention methods - Yes they are neat, but it's also easy to accidently get in a bad situation overusing them. Read up on msdn and blogs about them, follow the guidelines. Avoid extensions on generic types like object, string ect.

In my projects I always lay out extension methods in distinct namespaces depending on the type they interact with, which forces classes that wish to use them to be very explicate about it like:

namespace Extensions.IDictionary { ... }
namespace Extensions.string { ... }
namespace Extensions.SomeType { ... }
namespace Extensions.IList { ... }

and consuming code would have using clauses to match:

using Extensions.IDictionary;

to pull in just the extensions your interested in, no more.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot, I'm new in c#, I didn't know about extensions methods. Cool feature! –  AsKaiser-FR Apr 19 '12 at 15:17
    
@AsKaiser No problem! In the future please try to write out your questions with as much information as possible to avoid any confusion though. No-one likes to guess! I added a short note on extension methods for you as well. –  asawyer Apr 19 '12 at 15:22

This is just a guess as your question is not clear.

// Validate and assign

foreach(KeyValuePair<string,string> pair in arguments)
{
    if(!String.IsNullOrEmpty(pair.Value))
    {
        Console.WriteLine(pair.Value);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If you have more then just one firstnames, and lastnames, and, you could use a List for a Value of Dictionary. This way you can simply add other values for firstname, lastname, and others.

To validate, you can do it between adding values into dictionary:

 string request = "firstname=foo+lastname=bar+amout=100.58+firstname=+lastname=bar2+amout=100.59+firstname=foo3+lastname3=bar3+amout=100.60";

        Dictionary<string, List<string>> arguments = new Dictionary<string, List<string>>();
        request.Split('+').ToList<string>().ForEach(f =>
            {
                string[] data = f.Split('=');
                if (data.Length == 2)
                {
                    if (!arguments.ContainsKey(data[0]))
                    {
                        if (data[1] != "")
                            arguments.Add(data[0], new List<string> { data[1] });
                        else
                            arguments.Add(data[0], new List<string> { "no firstname" });
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        if (data[1] != "")
                            arguments[data[0]].Add(data[1]);
                        else
                            arguments[data[0]].Add("no firstname");
                    }
                }
            });

Hope it helps, bye

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