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I have been developing the skeleton of a database that will support versioning of data using Code First in EF 4.3.1.

I had the models persisting and loading properly a couple of days ago but I have broken something since and I can't figure out what is wrong. All of the classes get mapped and tables are created, data is persisted as well. So in the storring direction, everything works fine! BUT, when I try to load a Registration entity, the values are all what the default constructor is setting them to. I'm thinking maybe the data isn't being loaded after the Registration constructor is called, but I'm at the end of my current abilities to figure out what's happening!

The fundamentals are these two classes, from which my verion-able classes derive...

public abstract class VersionBase<T> {
    [Key]
    public Int64 Id { get; protected set; }
    public DateTime CreationDateTime { get; protected set; }

    // Value is virtual to support overriding to let deriving classes specify attributes for the property, such as [Required] to specify a non-nullable System.String
    public virtual T Value { get; internal set; }

    protected VersionBase() {
        CreationDateTime = DateTime.Now;
    }

    protected VersionBase(T value)
        : this() {
        Value = value;
    }
}

public abstract class VersionedBase<TVersion, TBase>
    where TVersion : VersionBase<TBase>, new() {
    [Key]
    public Int64 Id { get; protected set; }
    public virtual ICollection<TVersion> Versions { get; protected set; }

    protected VersionedBase() {
        Versions = new List<TVersion>();
    }

    [NotMapped]
    public Boolean HasValue {
        get {
            return Versions.Any();
        }
    }

    [NotMapped]
    public TBase Value {
        get {
            if (HasValue)
                return Versions.OrderByDescending(x => x.CreationDateTime).First().Value;
            throw new InvalidOperationException(this.GetType().Name + " has no value");
        }
        set {
            Versions.Add(new TVersion { Value = value });
        }
    }
}

Examples of derived classes...

public class VersionedInt32 : VersionedBase<VersionedInt32Version, Int32> { }

public class VersionedInt32Version : VersionBase<Int32> {
    public VersionedInt32Version() : base() { }
    public VersionedInt32Version(Int32 value) : base(value) { }
    public static implicit operator VersionedInt32Version(Int32 value) {
        return new VersionedInt32Version { Value = value };
    }
}

...and...

public class VersionedString : VersionedBase<VersionedStringVersion, String> { }

public class VersionedStringVersion : VersionBase<String> {
    public VersionedStringVersion() : base() { }
    public VersionedStringVersion(String value) : base(value) { }
    public static implicit operator VersionedStringVersion(String value) {
        return new VersionedStringVersion { Value = value };
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// The [Required] attribute tells Entity Framework that we want this column to be non-nullable
    /// </summary>
    [Required]
    public override String Value { get; internal set; }
}

My calling code is as such...

static void Main(String[] args) {
    using (var db = new VersionedFieldsContext()) {
        Registration registration = new Registration();
        registration.FirstName.Value = "Test";
        registration.FirstName.Versions.Add("Derp");
        db.Registration.Add(registration);
        db.SaveChanges();
    }
    using (var db = new VersionedFieldsContext()) {
        Registration registration = db.Registration.First();
        // InvalidOperationException at next line: "VersionedString has no value"
        String asdf = registration.FirstName.Value;
    }
}

public class Registration {
    [Key]
    public Int64 Id { get; set; }
    public DateTime CreationDateTime { get; set; }
    public VersionedString FirstName { get; set; }

    public Registration() {
        CreationDateTime = DateTime.Now;
        FirstName = new VersionedString();
    }
}

public class VersionedFieldsContext : DbContext {
    public DbSet<Registration> Registration { get; set; }

    public VersionedFieldsContext() {
        Database.SetInitializer<VersionedFieldsContext>(new DropCreateDatabaseIfModelChanges<VersionedFieldsContext>());
    }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder) {
        base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);
        modelBuilder.Conventions.Remove<PluralizingTableNameConvention>();
    }
}

Thanks for any insight!

share|improve this question
1  
Not directly related to the question, but I'm curious... this is very smart code but aren't you afraid about the performance implications of the amount of joins/roundtrips in/to the DB you will have for loading the simplest things? Imagine you want to load a entity with 5 strings (of your type VersionedString): the sql will have to join 5 times through two tables to get the strings. And you either have to specify a huge Include chain or will have multiple lazy loading roundtrips and always load the whole collection of versions before you filter out the latest in memory. –  Slauma Apr 19 '12 at 17:42
    
I hadn't been thinking about that too much yet, but since you asked I have been pondering some ways to improve performance. –  Nick Strupat Apr 19 '12 at 18:20
    
My first idea is to make a Value property in VersionedBase<T> that holds the most recent value as well as a UpdateDateTime column that represents the CreationDateTime of that current value. That way you would just .Include()' the Versioned[Type]` property to efficiently get the latest value. The problem with that is the Versions property wouldn't correctly represent the versions of the data. –  Nick Strupat Apr 19 '12 at 18:26
    
The round-trips would be a performance problem. I don't see the joins being bad. They would be done in the DB. –  Nick Strupat Apr 19 '12 at 18:57
1  
They happen in the DB, yes. But they add up for every single table and column where you are using a VersionedXXX property. At least, it is something I would test early with a DB of realistic size before you run into real performance problems in production which force you to make huge changes in your model infrastructure to fix the problems. Just saying..., it's up to you... :) –  Slauma Apr 19 '12 at 20:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need two changes:

  • Remove instantiation of FirstName from the Registration constructor so that the constructor is only:

    public Registration() {
        CreationDateTime = DateTime.Now;
    }
    

    Creating an instance of a navigation reference (not collections) in an entity's default constructor causes known problems: What would cause the Entity Framework to save an unloaded (but lazy loadable) reference over existing data?

  • If you have fixed the first point, your custom exception changes to a NullReferenceException. To fix this make the FirstName property in Registration virtual because the code in your second using block requires lazy loading:

    public virtual VersionedString FirstName { get; set; }
    

Edit

A workaround to create a registration and automatically instantiate the FirstName might be a factory method:

public class Registration {
    [Key]
    public Int64 Id { get; set; }
    public DateTime CreationDateTime { get; set; }
    public VersionedString FirstName { get; set; }

    public Registration() {
        CreationDateTime = DateTime.Now;
    }

    public static Registration Create() {
        return new Registration {
            FirstName = new VersionedString()
        }
    }
}

EF uses the default constructor when it materializes a Registration object. In your custom code you could use the factory method when you need to create an instance of Registration:

var registration = Registration.Create();

It can be less useful though when you work with change tracking or lazy loading proxies and want to create a proxy instance manually:

var registration = db.Registration.Create();

This again will call the default constructor and you have to instantiate the FirstName after the object is already created.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I would have never figured that out. –  Nick Strupat Apr 19 '12 at 16:46
    
I was hoping to get the VersionedString initialized automatically, is there a workaround to make that happen? –  Nick Strupat Apr 19 '12 at 16:48
    
Why does the code in my second using block require lazy loading? –  Nick Strupat Apr 19 '12 at 17:13
    
@NickStrupat: See my Edit. But it's not perfect, because there is no protection that you accidentally call the default constructor in your code instead of the factory method. But I don't know a better solution. –  Slauma Apr 19 '12 at 17:20
1  
@NickStrupat: Because you don't load the navigation property in db.Registration.First();. You could replace it with eager loading of course: db.Registration.Include(r => r.FirstName).First();. Then you don't need to make the FirstName virtual. –  Slauma Apr 19 '12 at 17:22

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