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I'm adding an object to a NSMutableArray like this:

[array addObject:myObject];

I now want to send a reference to my delegates of the Array Index where this object was added. Is there an easy way to find out the index where my object was added in the array so that later I can call

[array objectAtIndex:index] 

to get a reference back for it?

Thanks!

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while adding object you can give your index also [array addObject:myObject atIndex:index]; –  Charan Apr 19 '12 at 15:10
    
@SreeCharan There is no such method addObject:atIndex: in NSMutableArray. Did you mean -insertObject:atIndex:? –  Jason Coco Apr 19 '12 at 15:16
    
yeah, sorry, its insertObject: atIndex: –  Charan Apr 19 '12 at 15:24
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6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Rather than passing the index of an object (which could be incorrect) to your delegate, pass a reference to the object itself. If the delegate needs the index of the object in the array, it can figure it out itself using -indexOfObject: as Antonio MG describes. The index of any given object in a mutable array can change as objects are added, inserted, and deleted. Counting on indices to remain valid over any period of time is like leaving a jelly sandwich on the counter -- it's sure to attract bugs.

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You need to serialize access to a mutable array and -addObject: always adds the object to the end of the array. Given those two assertions, you know the index of the next added object will always be the current length of the array. So the following will hold true:

NSUInteger nextIndex = [array count];
[array addObject:myObject];
// you can now tell your delegates that nextIndex is the index of myObject
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yes.. but what if I do: { [array addObject:obj1]; [array addObject:obj2]; [array removeObject:obj1]; [array addObject:obj3]} Could the index for obj3 be 0 instead of 1 sometimes? –  Fervus Apr 19 '12 at 15:16
    
@Fervus Yes, you're right -- indices change. Don't use the index of an object in a mutable array to refer to the object; use a reference to the object itself instead. –  Caleb Apr 19 '12 at 15:20
    
@Fervus You would need to record each index first, or you would start with the current count and then know the order you add objects to / remove objects. That's why it's required that you serialize access to the mutable array. If you're going to be shifting the array around a lot, then you should find another way to track the object locations. –  Jason Coco Apr 19 '12 at 15:26
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Use this method for that:

index = [animalOptions indexOfObject:myObject];
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This potentially requires walking the entire array when you already know exactly what index -addObject: is going to place the new object at. This would only be useful if you're not planning to communicate the index and you know your arrays are going to be relatively small and your object's -equalTo: and -hash methods are sound. –  Jason Coco Apr 19 '12 at 15:14
    
@JasonCoco It's not entirely clear from the question what might come between adding the object and wanting to know its index. It could be that the latter happens directly after the former, in which case using the array's count works (and kudos to you for at least stating some constraints w.r.t. that), but then again it might not. Using -indexOfObject: is the most general, most correct direct answer to the OP's question. Also, remember that NSArray doesn't always behave the way you'd expect, so the method here might not be so bad. –  Caleb Apr 19 '12 at 15:49
    
@Caleb Yeah, I realized that after the OP posted another comment. However, if that's the case, the OP should think of a better way to track these objets (maybe using an index set and leaving the objects in the array or, if they're very big, swapping them for NSNull instance and removing their index from the index set). I know that the array may not always behave in a way we expect, but we plan for the worst case (and currently the array implementation actually does behave this way until it's extremely, extremely huge) –  Jason Coco Apr 19 '12 at 16:07
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The latest added object should be at [array count] - 1 index. You can always rely on "count - 1" scheme to determine the last index.

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If you call addObject you always add the object at the end (so count - 1). You can use "insertObject:atIndex:" to specify an index. For your question: indexOfObject:

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Direct after adding the object's index is array.count -1 .

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why the down vote? –  Kai Huppmann Apr 19 '12 at 15:34
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