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I'm trying to implement a function that initializes an arbitrarily sized list with objects, similar to how numpy array initialization methods work.

def fill(shape, object):

I've been banging my head against this but can't think of a way to do this for arbitrary length dimensionality. I'm guessing it will require recursion of some sort.

Here is an example of the desired behavior. For simplicity the object is just the floating-point number 0, but I need this to work with any class:

> fill( (2, 3, 4), 0.)
[
 [[ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
  [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
  [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.]]
,
 [[ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
  [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.],
  [ 0.,  0.,  0.,  0.]]
]
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up vote 5 down vote accepted

Try the following recursive implementation

def fill(shape,value):
    if not shape: return value
    return [fill(shape[1:],value) for i in range(shape[0])]

A non recursive version

import copy
def fill(shape,value):
    result=value
    for i in reversed(shape):
        result=[copy.deepcopy(result) for j in range(i)]
    return result
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Not seen anything standard for this, this is my attempt- could add something for *args and **kwargs too

In [1]: def fill(dimensions,cls):
   ...:     size_list=[cls()]*dimensions[-1]
   ...:     for dimension in dimensions[:0:-1]:
   ...:         size_list=[size_list]*dimension
   ...:     return size_list
   ...: 

In [2]: print fill((2,3,4),float)
[[[0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0], [0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0], [0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0]], [[0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0], [0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0], [0.0, 0.0, 0.0, 0.0]]]
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4  
Multiplying a list by an integer n won't make n new lists, it'll only make multiple references to the same list. – DSM Apr 19 '12 at 15:30
    
of course, my mistake – GP89 Apr 19 '12 at 15:32
    
Also, it only works for three dimensions. It fails on fill((2,3,4,5), float). – Tim Pietzcker Apr 19 '12 at 15:39
    
Ah, I've never sliced in reverse before, should be [:0:-1]. Use Abhijit's answer anyway :P – GP89 Apr 19 '12 at 15:43

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