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H I'm trying to figure out why two similar but slightly different SQL queries have such a large discrepancy between the time taken to run them. I would appreciate input based on the two samples below and the times reported.

The first query is as follows and it takes approximately 115 - 154 seconds to run.

SELECT * FROM 
(
    SELECT a.*, ROWNUM rnum 
    FROM 
    (
        SELECT ERR_ID, ERR_CREATED_BY,TO_CHAR(ERR_CREATED_DATE, 'DD/MM/YYYY H24:MI'),  
               ERR_SOURCE, ERR_DETAIL  
        FROM tdsys_errors  err   
        WHERE ERR_SOURCE = 'Online Transaction'  
        ORDER BY ERR_ID DESC 
    ) a 
    WHERE ROWNUM <= 25
) 
WHERE rnum > 0;

The second query has a slight change in terms of the position of the "ORDER BY ERR_ID DESC " piece and takes approximately 0.07 seconds to run

SELECT * FROM 
(
    SELECT a.*, ROWNUM rnum 
    FROM 
    (
        SELECT ERR_ID, ERR_CREATED_BY,TO_CHAR(ERR_CREATED_DATE, 'DD/MM/YYYY H24:MI'),  
               ERR_SOURCE, ERR_DETAIL  
        FROM tdsys_errors  err   
        WHERE ERR_SOURCE = 'Online Transaction'    
    ) a 
    WHERE ROWNUM <= 25
) 
WHERE rnum > 0
ORDER BY ERR_ID DESC;

I'm guessing the second query is ordered AFTER the results arrive and the first query tries to do all at once. Is this an SQL best practice case is what I'm wondering and why is there such a difference?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Looks like you have an unnecessary level of nesting there.. In the first (correct) block of code you could remove the outer query. Also WHERE rownum > 0 always evaluates true and is superfluous. –  Arth Apr 19 '12 at 15:31
    
I'd also almost always choose order by created date rather than id.. as presumably you are looking for the latest errors. –  Arth Apr 19 '12 at 15:41
    
The whole statement WHERE rnum > 0 is unnecessary, as I rather doubt it's possible to get a negative row number. A '0' number I'm less sure of (everything I've seen so far starts at 1, but I don't work with mySQL), but you'd probably want that row anyways. As noted elsewhere, in the second query you're getting 25 random rows (that match the inner WHERE clause), which may not be what you want. –  Clockwork-Muse Apr 19 '12 at 15:45
    
Hi, David below wrote a good query to workaround the issue, I tested it and it works well. I accepted Alex'x answer because it answered my original query and cleared things up for me. –  Stephen Apr 20 '12 at 9:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In the first case you're selecting the first 25 rows - those with the lowest highest err_id. It has to find all the results from your query and then order them all before it knows which 25 to use, which is clearly taking a while.

In the second case you're pulling the first 25 rows returned by the unordered query, which could be anything but is quick, and then ordering only those 25.

You are likely to get different results form the two queries - you certainly shouldn't assume they'll always be the same, even if they happen to be sometimes.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I didn't realise that the second query wwould return random undesired results compared to the first query. Now I know why the time difference. I'm going to try and tweak the query to be faster and still return the results I want. When i do I'll post here if I can –  Stephen Apr 19 '12 at 17:12

Your own sumise is correct, the first query orders the rows from tdsys_errors by the err_id, takes the first 25 of those, and then returns those. The second query just outputs 25 rows (no order guarenteed) and then orders those random 25 rows.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply –  Stephen Apr 19 '12 at 17:13

The reason is that first query has to order all the rows in the tdsys_errors table, whereas the second query only has the 25 rows returned from the inner query to order.

Note that the output of the two queries can be different.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I'll try and tweak the query to perform better now that I know –  Stephen Apr 19 '12 at 17:13

Assuming you're using Oracle 9i or higher, you can use the window/analytic function ROW_NUMBER() so you need not use multiple subqueries:

SELECT * FROM (
    SELECT ERR_ID, ERR_CREATED_BY, TO_CHAR(ERR_CREATED_DATE, 'DD/MM/YYYY H24:MI')
         , ERR_SOURCE, ERR_DETAIL, ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY ERR_ID DESC) AS rnum
       FROM tdsys_errors  err   
      WHERE ERR_SOURCE = 'Online Transaction'
) WHERE rnum <= 25
 ORDER BY ERR_ID DESC;

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi David, I had re written the query before I read that, my query is as follows and both cut the time down from 154 seconds to just over 10 seconds so well done, I'll have to choose between the two now :select * from ( SELECT ERR_ID, ERR_CREATED_BY, TO_CHAR(ERR_CREATED_DATE, 'DD/MM/YYYY HH24:MI'), ERR_SOURCE, ERR_DETAIL FROM tdsys_errors where err_id in ( SELECT ERR_ID FROM tdsys_errors WHERE ERR_SOURCE = 'Online Transaction' ) ORDER BY ERR_ID DESC ) where rownum <=25 –  Stephen Apr 20 '12 at 9:14
    
@David.. but using the row_number() analytic function saves you 0 subqueries.. surely you can just ORDER BY on the subquery. –  Arth Apr 20 '12 at 12:53
    
@Stephen.. your inner subquery is unnecessary just add the WHERE ERR_SOURCE = .. to the query surrounding it. Again if you want the latest errors, order by date created not id. If you are worried about speed i suggest adding an index to err_source (and created date if you use it). –  Arth Apr 20 '12 at 12:58
    
@Arth Adding an index to err_source is the very thing I did, it sped it up in the end to 0.04 seconds. I went down that route in the end –  Stephen Apr 25 '12 at 13:48

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