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Say for example I have the following type:

    public class Site
    {
       public string Name { get; set; }
       public int SiteId { get; set; }
       public bool IsLocal { get; set; }
    }

The above type can be assigned to be held in a Propety in a ViewModel like so assuming a corresponding backing field has been created but omitted here ofc:

    public Site SelectedSite
    {
        get { return _selectedSite; }
        set
        {
            _selectedSite = value;
            // raise property changed etc
        }
    }

In my xaml a straight forward binding would be:

            <TextBlock x:Name="StatusMessageTextBlock"
                   Width="Auto"
                   Height="Auto"
                   Style="{StaticResource StatusMessageboxTextStyle}"
                   Text="{Binding MessageToDisplay,
                                  Mode=OneWay,
                                  UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged}" />

Can you extend a binding by using the dot notation syntax? e.g:

            <TextBlock x:Name="StatusMessageTextBlock"
                   Width="Auto"
                   Height="Auto"
                   Style="{StaticResource StatusMessageboxTextStyle}"
                   **Text="{Binding SelectedSite.Name,**
                                  Mode=OneWay,
                                  UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged}" />

Seems like a an interesting feature but my gut instinct is a no as my DC is being assigned at RunTime so at DesignTime or CompileTime, I can't see any clues that could make this feature work or not?

Correct me if have misunderstood what a complex object is, I have simplified mine down for the sake of this question.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Of course this is possible. However, WPF needs to know when any property along the path has changed. To that end, you need to implement INotifyPropertyChanged (or other supported mechanisms). In your example, both Site and the VM containing SelectedSite should implement change notification).

Here's how you could implement the functionality you specified in your question:

// simple DTO
public class Site
{
   public string Name { get; set; }
   public int SiteId { get; set; }
   public bool IsLocal { get; set; }
}

// base class for view models
public abstract class ViewModel
{
    // see http://kentb.blogspot.co.uk/2009/04/mvvm-infrastructure-viewmodel.html for an example
}

public class SiteViewModel : ViewModel
{
    private readonly Site site;

    public SiteViewModel(Site site)
    {
        this.site = site;
    }

    // this is what your view binds to
    public string Name
    {
        get { return this.site.Name; }
        set
        {
            if (this.site.Name != value)
            {
                this.site.Name = value;
                this.OnPropertyChanged(() => this.Name);
            }
        }
    }

    // other properties
}

public class SitesViewModel : ViewModel
{
    private readonly ICollection<SiteViewModel> sites;
    private SiteViewModel selectedSite;

    public SitesViewModel()
    {
        this.sites = ...;
    }

    public ICollection<SiteViewModel> Sites
    {
        get { return this.sites; }
    }

    public SiteViewModel SelectedSite
    {
        get { return this.selectedSite; }
        set
        {
            if (this.selectedSite != value)
            {
                this.selectedSite = value;
                this.OnPropertyChanged(() => this.SelectedSite);
            }
        }
    }
}

And your view might look something like this (assuming a DataContext of type SitesViewModel):

<ListBox ItemsSource="{Binding Sites}" SelectedItem="{Binding SelectedSite}"/>
share|improve this answer
    
hmmm ... are you saying that my simple type 'Site' will need to implement the 'INotifyPropertyChanged' interface? –  IbrarMumtaz Apr 19 '12 at 19:29
    
@IbrarMumtaz: if you have properties that change (such as Name), then yes. If all the properties in the type are readonly then there is no need to implement INotifyPropertyChanged, since no property will ever change. –  Kent Boogaart Apr 19 '12 at 19:31
    
I am using MVVM Light framework and that makes things alot easier but I am unfamiliar with the technique of custom types implementing this interface I always thought it was your ViewModels that had to do this. Got an article that explains this approach? –  IbrarMumtaz Apr 19 '12 at 19:31
    
@IbrarMumtaz: usually it is your view models implementing property change notifications. If Site is a simple data object, you could wrap it in a VM that provides change notification. I'll update my post with an example. –  Kent Boogaart Apr 19 '12 at 19:32

Below is what worked for me:

        public Site SelectedSite
        {
            get { return _selectedSite; }
            set
            {
                _selectedSite = value;
                RaisePropertyChanged("SelectedSite");
            }
        }

In my xaml I was able to do:

        <TextBox Name="tbSiteName"
                 Width="250"
                 Height="30"
                 Margin="0"
                 HorizontalAlignment="Left"
                 VerticalAlignment="Top"
                 IsReadOnly="True"
                 Style="{StaticResource MainTextBoxStyle}"
                 Text="{Binding SelectedSite.Name,
                          Mode=OneWay,
                          UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged}" />

This allows you to access data members off the Site Type without having to create individual properties that wrap each data member on the Site Type. Then individual controls can bind to each property declared in the VM. In a one to one fashion, this aproach can become rather verbose. The binding extension attached to the Text property of the TextBox control shown above, shows that we are not binding to a simple straight forward property but actually to a custom type. Potentially removing the need to create more public properties.

share|improve this answer
    
You've also tied your view to your domain model. I would advise against this, as I did in my answer. Almost inevitably you'll find - sooner or later - that you need extra, view-specific information packeted with your domain data. If you've got a heap of code binding directly to the domain object, it'll make the refactoring job much harder. Better to bite the bullet and just use view models for everything, even if the view model initially adds nothing to the domain object. –  Kent Boogaart Apr 20 '12 at 14:12
    
I do understand where you are coming from ... I am going to keep my work as it is and let this problem arise naturally. Best way for me to learn is by witnessing the problem first hand. = ) –  IbrarMumtaz Apr 24 '12 at 8:43

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