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Can we pass a reference of a variable that is immutable as argument in a function?

Example:

var x = 0;
function a(x)
{
    x++;
}
a(x);
alert(x); //Here I want to have 1 instead of 0
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6 Answers 6

up vote 28 down vote accepted

You'll need to make the variable an object instead:

var x = {Value: 0};

function a(obj)
{
    obj.Value++;
}

a(x);
document.write(x.Value); //Here i want to have 1 instead of 0

In this case, x is a reference to an object. When x is passed to the function a, that reference is copied over to obj. Thus, obj and x refer to the same thing in memory. Changing the Value property of obj affects the Value property of x.

Javascript will always pass function parameters by value. That's simply a specification of the language. You could create x in a scope local to both functions, and not pass the variable at all.

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Is there a way of doing it so another person will just do : var x=0;a(x); and that the function set an object with the value of x ? (or something like that) –  user1342369 Apr 19 '12 at 16:02
1  
@user1342369 - No, as Javascript will always pass primitive data types by value. That's simply a specification of the language. You could create x in a scope local to both functions, and not pass the variable at all. –  Mike Christensen Apr 19 '12 at 16:07
1  
Hey, thanks for introducing me to code snippets on SO. Hadn't heard of them before I saw it used in your answer. –  Joeytje50 Nov 20 at 11:28
    
@Joeytje50 - Yup, this feature was just added back in September. Very handy! –  Mike Christensen Nov 20 at 16:43

This question may help: How to pass variable by reference in javascript? Read data from ActiveX function which returns more than one value

To summarise, Javascript primitive types are always passed by value, whereas the values inside objects are passed by reference (thanks to commenters for pointing out my oversight). So to get round this, you have to put your integer inside an object:

var myobj = {x:0};

function a(obj)
{
    obj.x++;
}

a(myobj);
alert(myobj.x); // returns 1
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Object variables are always passed by value as well -- it's just that the value is a reference to an object. There's a difference between passing by reference and passing a reference by value. Namely, when you pass x by value, whether x is an object or not, you can't replace it with a whole other value in any way the caller will see. –  cHao Apr 19 '12 at 17:31
    
whereas objects are passed by reference is simply not true. Nothing in JavaScript is passed by reference. –  Mike Christensen Oct 31 '13 at 0:33

I have found a slightly different way implement pointers that is perhaps more general and easier to understand from a C perspective (and thus fits more into the format of the users example).

In JavaScript, like in C, array variables are actually just pointers to the array, so you can use an array as exactly the same as declaring a pointer. This way, all pointers in your code can be used the same way, despite what you named the variable in the original object.

It also allows one to use two different notations referring to the address of the pointer and what is at the address of the pointer.

Here is an example (I use the underscore to denote a pointer):

var _x = [ 10 ];

function foo(_a){
    _a[0] += 10;
}

foo(_x);

console.log(_x[0]);

Yields

output: 20
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In javascript that would be a global. Howver your function would look more like this:

function a(){
   x++;
};

Since x is in the global context you don't need to pass it into the function.

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1  
Valid point, though I'd point out the variable doesn't need to be global (and many would advise against doing this ever), it simply needs to be in the same scope as the caller and the callee. –  Mike Christensen Apr 19 '12 at 15:58
    
That's a great point. –  Maess Apr 19 '12 at 16:00

In JavaScript, you cannot pass variables by reference to a function. However you can pass an object by reference.

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Simply not true. You cannot pass anything by reference in JavaScript. –  Mike Christensen Oct 31 '13 at 0:33

You refer to 'x' from window object

var x = 0;

function a(key, ref) {
    ref = ref || window;  // object reference - default window
    ref[key]++;
}

a('x');                   // string
alert(x);
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