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I'll be honest - I don't fully understand how ActiveRecord's calculation and grouping methods work. However, the api seems pretty clear on the following being correct format:

Locations.images.count(:image_id, :group => "location_id")

The problem comes from the return value - something that isn't actually defined anywhere in the API, and for the count methods seems to change semi-randomly based on what you feed it. And here, at least, it doesn't seem to make any sense:

{[488, 21]=>nil, [464, 1]=>nil}

That first number in the array is my location ids, good enough. The second is the appropriate count - awesome.

But why the heck is it returning in this format? Why are they in a hash of arrays-as-keys pointing to nil? Is this what's /supposed/ to be returned here, and what purpose does it serve?

I feel like I'm missing something, and like I'm not sure if I can trust the function to do what I need. And I'm not so keen on having to convert that to

{488 => 21, 464 => 1}

manually, but the last bit I can live with.

Can anyone provide me some clarification?

Version: Ruby 1.8.7, Rails 3.0.11

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possible duplicate of Count Returned Hashes –  Dave Schweisguth 21 hours ago
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1 Answer 1

Try this:

Locations.images.group('location_id').count

It should return:

{488=>24, 464=>1}

UPDATE: The example which works for me:

Lexeme.all
  Lexeme Load (0.2ms)  SELECT "lexemes".* FROM "lexemes" 
+----+---------+---------+---------+---------------------+---------------------+
| id | user_id | word_id | counter | created_at          | updated_at          |
+----+---------+---------+---------+---------------------+---------------------+
| 1  | 1       | 1       | 3       | 2012-04-12 21:37... | 2012-04-12 21:37... |
| 2  | 1       | 2       | 4       | 2012-04-12 21:38... | 2012-04-12 21:38... |
| 3  | 1       | 3       | 5       | 2012-04-12 21:38... | 2012-04-12 21:38... |
| 4  | 2       | 5       | 3       | 2012-04-19 16:28... | 2012-04-19 16:28... |
+----+---------+---------+---------+---------------------+---------------------+

Lexeme.group('user_id').count
   (0.2ms)  SELECT COUNT(*) AS count_all, user_id AS user_id FROM "lexemes" GROUP BY user_id
 => {1=>3, 2=>1}

As you can see, there're three records for user 1 and one record for user 2.

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Nope... returns the same strange hash. That's how the other version is supposed to work as well, I believe. –  GlyphGryph Apr 19 '12 at 17:03
    
Well, I can't be aware of your project, I can only put my example - see the update. –  megas Apr 19 '12 at 17:06
    
I've included the version numbers - if you are using the same version, definitely has to be something local messing with it, which I'd count as a solution of one sort, at least. Actually - does it work that way as well if you use the format provided in the original question, as well? Thanks. –  GlyphGryph Apr 19 '12 at 17:09
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