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I have the following code

while (*ptr != ',') {
    int items_read = sscanf(ptr, "%91[^,]%n", field, &n);
    printf("field = \"%s\"\n", field);
    field[0]='\0';
    if (items_read == 1)
        ptr += n; /* advance the pointer by the number of characters read */
    if ( *ptr != ',' ) {
        break; /* didn't find an expected delimiter, done? */
    }
    ++ptr; /* skip the delimiter */
}

It reads through my string and creates a new array for each string it finds between the commas, however I have white space in the middle of the string. I have many strings that will be read in, and some of those have white space in more than one area (after that middle place) and I do not want that white space accounted for, just the first instances.

I know I can put || ' ' on the while line, the int line, and/or the second if line but I haven't gotten to do what I need done.

I've heard that using strtok isn't good, or at least there are better ways to do that. I do not know how to add additional 'flags' (like the commas in my code) for the code to by-pass.

ex:
3,875,837 file1.ext
3,437,281 document two.txt

I already have the beginnings doing what I want.

field1 = 3  
field2 = 875  
field3 = 837

However I want the rest of the string on those 2 inputs to go into separate char arrays and print out as follows:

field4 = file1  
field5 = ext  

and

field4 = document  
field5 = two  
field6 = txt

Or, I'm thinking now, is there anyway I can extract the last iteration of that char array field in order to use another loop through the exact same code except replace the ,s with ' ' spaces?

share|improve this question
    
If ptr points to null terminated array make it safer with: while (*ptr && *ptr != ',') { –  Morpfh Apr 19 '12 at 16:10
1  
strtok writes zero bytes into the input argument, destroying its contents basically, so if you 1) want to use it with a literal constant, or b) you need the input string later, you'll have to make a working copy first and call strtok on that. Other than that, it's not a bad function! –  Mr Lister Apr 19 '12 at 16:14
    
@Rune: as of right now ptr is pointing to char str[] which I have initialized to my 'sample' string I'm testing with. I suppose when I am "inputting" all the separate strings I won't be directly putting them into my char array str I don't know; I am fairly new to programming so I'm not even sure how I would go about bringing in all my strings after I get this code working. A sscanf with gets() or something I suppose. @Mr.Lister Thank you that makes perfect sense I didn't really know how strtok worked inside but I have a much better understanding and feel comfortable experimenting with it. –  1337475 Apr 19 '12 at 17:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Depends a lot on what you want to use the data for. How to use it elsewhere in the code etc.

Guess I'd often use plain iteration on parsing like this. If you want to use sscanf this might help; as an example:

#include <stdio.h>

int prnt_fields(char **ptr)
{
    char field[128];
    int n;
    int i = 0;

    printf("Item {\n");
    while (**ptr) {
        if(sscanf(*ptr, "%127[^\t\n., ]%n", field, &n) != 1)
            break;
        printf("  %d => '%s'\n", i++, field);
        (*ptr) += n;
        /* To handle multiple spaces tabs etc.: */
        if(sscanf(*ptr, "%127[ \t.,]%n", field, &n))
            (*ptr) += n;
        /* Or:
        n = 0;
        sscanf(*ptr, "%*[ \t.,]%n", &n);
        (*ptr) += n;
        */

        if (**ptr == '\n') {
            printf("} OK!\n");
            (*ptr)++;
            return **ptr != '\0';
        }
    }
    /* Should never end here unless input is invalid;
     * aka not separated with , \n or over long fields (>127) */
    printf("} something failed!\n");
    return 0;
}

int main(void)
{
    char *tst = "3,875,837 file1.ext\n"
        "6,875,847 file2.ext\n"
        "3,437,281 document two.txt\n"
        "9,991,123\tdrei.txt\n"
        "4,494,123        vier    fünf .    txt\n"
        ;
    char field[128];
    int n;
    char *ptr = tst;
    int i = 0;

    while (*ptr) {
        if(sscanf(ptr, "%127[^, \n.]%n", field, &n) != 1)
            break;
        printf("field%d = '%s'\n", i++, field);
        ptr += n+1;

        /* If one want to validate separator

        ptr += n;
        if (*ptr != ',' && *ptr != ' ' && *ptr != '\n')
            break;
        ++ptr;

        */
    }

    ptr = tst;

    printf("\n---------------\n");
    while (prnt_fields(&ptr) > 0)
        ;

    return 0;
}

Should give something like:

field0 = '3'
field1 = '875'
field2 = '837'
...
field18 = '123  drei' <= breaks here
field19 = 'txt'
field20 = '4'
field21 = '494'
field22 = '123'
Item {
  0 => '3'
  1 => '875'
  2 => '837'
  3 => 'file1'
  4 => 'ext'
} OK!
Item {
  0 => '6'
  1 => '875'
  2 => '847'
  3 => 'file2'
  4 => 'ext'
} OK!
Item {
  0 => '3'
  1 => '437'
  2 => '281'
  3 => 'document'
  4 => 'two'
  5 => 'txt'
} OK!
Item {
  0 => '9'
  1 => '991'
  2 => '123'
  3 => 'drei'
  4 => 'txt'
} OK!
Item {
  0 => '4'
  1 => '494'
  2 => '123'
  3 => 'vier'
  4 => 'fünf'
  5 => 'txt'
} OK!

Edit:

OK. This can be done much cleaner and nice, but you'll might get an idea:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <limits.h>

struct file_data {
    struct date {
        int y;
        int m;
        int d;
    } date;
    struct time {
        int h;
        int m;
    } time;
    int size_prt[8];    /* max 2^63 : 9223372036854775808 bytes */
    double size;
    char name[512];
    char ext[16];
    char ext_tr[16];
    char name_prt[32][128]; /* should be malloc or ptrs or done in func or.. */
};

/* Default */
static const struct file_data file_def = {
    {0,0,0},{0,0},{-1},0,{'\0'},{'\0'},{'\0'},{{'\0'}}
};

void prnt_filedata(FILE *fh, struct file_data fd)
{
    int i = 0;
    fprintf(fh,
        "File { \n"
        "  Date: %4d-%02d-%02d\n"
        "  Time: %02d:%02d\n"
        "  Size: %.f\n"
        "  Size: %.2f K\n"
        "  Size: %.2f M\n"
        "  Size: %.2f G\n"
        "  Name: '%s'\n"
        "  Ext : '%s'\n"
        "  ExtT: '%s'\n"
        "  Szpt: ",
        fd.date.y, fd.date.m, fd.date.d,
        fd.time.h, fd.time.m,
        fd.size,
        (fd.size / (1 << 10)),
        (fd.size / (1 << 20)),
        (fd.size / (1 << 30)),
        fd.name,
        fd.ext,
        fd.ext_tr
        );
    while (fd.size_prt[i] != -1)
        fprintf(fh, "%d ", fd.size_prt[i++]);
    fprintf(fh, "\n  Fprt: ");
    i = 0;
    while (*fd.name_prt[i])
        fprintf(fh, "'%s' ", fd.name_prt[i++]);
    fprintf(fh, "\n}\n");
}

int extr_file_data(char **ptr, struct file_data *fd)
{
    int i;
    int n;
    char size[26];
    char name[512];
    char *p;
    *fd = file_def;

    while (**ptr) {
        if (sscanf(*ptr,
            "%4d-%2d-%2d %d:%d %25[0123456789,] %511[^\n]%n",
            &fd->date.y, &fd->date.m, &fd->date.d,
            &fd->time.h, &fd->time.m,
            size, name, &n) != 7) {
            fprintf(stderr,
                " * ERR; Unable to extract from %s\n",
                *ptr);
            return 0;
        }
        (*ptr) += n;
        p = size;
        i = 0;
        /* Size parts + total */
        while (*p && i < 7) {
            fd->size_prt[i] = (int)strtol(p, &p, 0);
            fd->size *= 1000;
            fd->size += fd->size_prt[i++];
            if (*p) ++p;
        }
        fd->size_prt[i] = -1;   /* flag next to last  */
        /* get .ext */
        if ((p = strrchr(name, '.')) != NULL) {
            strncpy(fd->name, name, p - name);
            strncpy(fd->ext, p + 1, 16);
            /* trimmed ext */
            if (sscanf(fd->ext, "%15s", fd->ext_tr) != 1)
                *fd->ext_tr = '\0';
        } else {
            strncpy(fd->name, name, 511);
        }
        /* get trimmed parts of name */
        p = fd->name;
        i = 0;
        while (sscanf(p, "%127s%n", fd->name_prt[i++], &n) == 1 && i < 32)
            p+=n;
            ;
        *fd->name_prt[n] = '\0';

        if (**ptr == '\n')
            (*ptr)++;
        return **ptr != '\0';
    }
    return 0;
}

int main(void)
{
    char *tst =
        "2012-04-18 13:28                  32 ein.ext\n"
        "2012-04-18 13:28       2,446,875,847 zwei.xt  \n"
        "2012-04-18 13:28                   0 drei  .xt\n"
        "2012-04-18 13:28 7,694,587,183,883,665 vier fünf.txt\n"
        "2012-04-18 13:28 9,991,123\t\tsechs\n"
        "2012-04-18 13:28 4,494,123        sieben     acht  .   txt\n"
        ;
    char *ptr = tst;
    struct file_data fd;

    while (extr_file_data(&ptr, &fd) > 0)
        prnt_filedata(stdout, fd);
    prnt_filedata(stdout, fd);

    return 0;
}

Should give:

...
File { 
  Date: 2012-04-18
  Time: 13:28
  Size: 2446875847
  Size: 2389527.19 K
  Size: 2333.52 M
  Size: 2.28 G
  Name: 'zwei'
  Ext : 'xt  '
  ExtT: 'xt'
  Szpt: 2 446 875 847 
  Fprt: 'zwei' 
}
...
File { 
  Date: 2012-04-18
  Time: 13:28
  Size: 4494123
  Size: 4388.79 K
  Size: 4.29 M
  Size: 0.00 G
  Name: 'sieben     acht  '
  Ext : '   txt'
  ExtT: 'txt'
  Szpt: 4 494 123 
  Fprt: 'sieben' 'acht' 
}
...

Edit (again); sorry, only a weird shift i forgot to change after testing.

share|improve this answer
    
beforehand in my code, in main, after I set ptr to equal my string I added I believe 24 (an integer) to it to bypass those characters (they happened to be date and time) so the program would only read in the remaining characters as strings. I tried a couple places but couldn't figure out where I would put something like that in your code. Will that work somewhere in your code without messing up future loops? Thank you. –  1337475 Apr 19 '12 at 20:52
    
Yes, you could, but you could also simply read it in to a discarded buffer. Or the best would perhaps be to use a struct for the fields and ... hmmm. Probably shouldn't as you are learning; but easier with an example. I whip up some. –  Morpfh Apr 20 '12 at 0:32

You might take a look at the strcspn() method.

As a nice side effect it could be implemented multi-byte character safe.

share|improve this answer

How I'd do this would depend on the data. I'd probably read in one string, parse it into two at the first space possibly with strchr, then go through the first string splitting on commas.

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