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I have need of a .net structure (it mimics a connected devices internal map) and I want to use a try catch block since I'm using Marshall.PtrToStructure() and associated GChandle stuff. However I when I put the structures field assignments inside the try catch block I get this error "field1 must be fully assigned before control is returned to sender". The basic code works fine without the try catch block. Is there any way around this error while using try catch blocks? Should I use try catch?

[StructLayout( LayoutKind.Sequential )]
public struct Effects
{
    public UInt16 field_1;
    public UInt16 field_2;
    ...



    public Effects(byte[] effectsData)
    {
       GCHandle gch;
       try
       {
           gch = GCHandle.Alloc( effectsData, GCHandleType.Pinned );
           IntPtr pEffects = gch.AddrOfPinnedObject( );
           this = (Effects)Marshal.PtrToStructure( pEffects, typeof(Effects ) );
       }
       catch (Exception ex)
       {

       }
       finally
       {
           if (gch.IsAllocated)
               gch.Free( );
       }
    }
}
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Note: I left the catch block empty to save typeing, there are some trace staements there, but I thought them of no issue so I left them out. I stil get the error with code in that block. –  Gio Apr 19 '12 at 16:30
    
Let me repeat the question that I raised in my answer: What do you want to happen when an exception occurs in your constructor? Should your program continue with your Effects structure initialized to some default values? Or should your program stop executing? –  Heinzi Apr 19 '12 at 16:31
    
Everyone: Now I understand the issue, very simple actually as almost everyone pointed out, I wasn't intializing the structure in ALL code paths.. thanks for all the help... –  Gio Apr 19 '12 at 16:39
    
Why are you using PtrToStructure? –  Brian Gideon Apr 20 '12 at 13:54

8 Answers 8

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The constructor must guarantee that if it returns normally then all the fields are filled in.

Suppose your code throws an exception on the first line of the try. Then you catch the exception, eat it, and return, without having ever filled in any of the fields! The compiler detects this and disallows the program.

Eating every exception is almost certainly the wrong thing to do here. Do you really want to return an uninitialized structure if there was an unhandled and unexpected arbitrary exception?

If that is what you want to do then you can simply say:

public Effects(byte[] effectsData) : this() {

that will guarantee that the fields are initialized to their default values before the ctor block runs.

But again: is that really what you want to do? This code looks incredibly dangerous to me.

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What do you want to happen in case of an exception? As your code stands now, if an exception occurs in the try block, the exception is swallowed (since your catch block is empty), and the structure is uninitialized -- this is exactly what the compiler is complaining about.

If you need the try-catch block only for the finally part, don't use the catch block at all but just try-finally. Let errors bubble up to the user interface by not catching them. No catch block is (almost) always better than an empty catch block. Empty catch blocks make debugging a nightmare, since your code just "doesn't work" with no indication to what went wrong.

Thus, I'd rewrite your code as follows:

public Effects(byte[] effectsData) 
{ 
     GCHandle gch = GCHandle.Alloc( effectsData, GCHandleType.Pinned ); 
     try 
     { 
         IntPtr pEffects = gch.AddrOfPinnedObject( ); 
         this = (Effects)Marshal.PtrToStructure( pEffects, typeof(Effects ) ); 
     } 
     finally 
     { 
        if (gch.IsAllocated)
            gch.Free( ); 
     } 
} 

(If an error occurs in GCHandle.Alloc, gch will not be assigned, so there's no need to include it in the try-finally block.)

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1  
Why would a null reference exception be raised for accessing a value type? GCHandle is a struct. –  Eric Lippert Apr 19 '12 at 16:24
    
@EricLippert: Thanks, good point, fixed. –  Heinzi Apr 19 '12 at 16:26
    
I left the catch block free to save typeing...but whats the point of eliminating the catch block? –  Gio Apr 19 '12 at 16:27
2  
@Gio: The behaviour is different. Empty catch block: The exception is swallowed and your program continues normally after the catch block. No catch block: The exception bubbles up through the call stack, allowing the generic exeception handler that you have at the UI level (you do have one, don't you?) to catch it, and do useful stuff such as showing a helpful error message and/or logging it. –  Heinzi Apr 19 '12 at 16:30
2  
Now, you might wonder why it was that the compiler allowed you to use an uninitialized variable of type GCHandle in the first place. The answer to that is quite simple: the compiler detects whether a structure is initialized by counting the number of uninitialized fields. If it gets zero then the struct must be initialized. But as an optimization, the compiler does not load metadata for private fields. Therefore every local variable of a type that is a struct from metadata that has only private fields is treated as assigned to its default value! This is technically a compiler bug. –  Eric Lippert Apr 19 '12 at 18:19

Add this to the constructor

field_1 = 0;
field_2 = 0;
...

Structs behave differently from classes. You must assign all the fields explicitly in your constructor.

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See also "11.3.8 Constructors" in the C# Language Specification. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Apr 19 '12 at 16:51

You have to set all properties of your structure in the constructor.

As you inserted a try/catch, not all code paths allow those properties to be set.

You might want something like:

try
{
   // Tries to affect something

   // Then returns
   return;
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    // Set default values
    this.field1 = ....
}
finally
{
   if (gch.IsAllocated)
       gch.Free( );
}
share|improve this answer

A struct's members must all be initialised before you leave the constructor.

Either throw something when you catch the exception or initialise the data memebers to something sensible before you enter the try-catch loop. Or you could initialise the values to something inside the catch block.

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The problem is the empty catch block: how should the structure be initialized if an exception occurs?

If you really want to ignore exceptions, you'll have to initialize this to default values within the catch block. To set all fields to zero, just use

this = new Effects();

Or you can avoid the problem by letting the the exception propagate out of the constructor.

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A static member would be far less problematic and confusing than providing a second constructor:

public static Effects Create(byte[] effectsData)
{
   GCHandle gch;
   try
   {
       gch = GCHandle.Alloc( effectsData, GCHandleType.Pinned );
       IntPtr pEffects = gch.AddrOfPinnedObject( );
       return (Effects)Marshal.PtrToStructure( pEffects, typeof(Effects) );
   }
   finally
   {
       if (gch.IsAllocated)
           gch.Free( );
   }
}

Exception handling in this case is easily understood and maintained.

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Surely you must know the layout of the byte array right? Use the BitConverter class to initialize the fields. This way you do not need to worry about pinning, try-finally, and other unnecessary overhead.

[StructLayout( LayoutKind.Sequential )]
public struct Effects
{
    public UInt16 field_1;
    public UInt16 field_2;

    public static Effects FromBytes(byte[] data)
    {
        var value = new Effects();
        value.field_1 = BitConverter.ToUInt16(data, 0);
        value.field_2 = BitConverter.ToUInt16(data, 2);
        return value;
    }
}

Make whatever adjustments are necessary to accommodate endianness and alignment differences.

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