Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have code that I've created to do exactly this, however my question is there a way I can improve my code. It seems like there may be a better way to take care of this.

public static IEnumerable<string> SplitEvery(this string str, int chunkSize, bool splitAtSpaces)
    {
        var chars = str.ToCharArray();

        var i = 0;
        var currentString = string.Empty;

        var nextWord = false;

        while (i < chars.Length)
        {
            if (nextWord)
            {
                currentString = string.Empty;
                nextWord = false;
            }

            if (currentString.Length < chunkSize)
            {
                currentString += chars[i];
                if ((i + 1) == chars.Length)
                    yield return currentString;
                i++;
            }
            else
            {
                if (splitAtSpaces)
                {
                    var charAtEnd = currentString[currentString.Length - 1];

                    if (charAtEnd == ' ' || chars[i] == ' ')
                    {
                        nextWord = true;
                        yield return currentString;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        var lastSpace = currentString.LastIndexOf(' ');
                        i = lastSpace + 1;
                        nextWord = true;
                        yield return currentString.Substring(0, i);
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    nextWord = true;
                    yield return currentString;
                }
            }
        }
share|improve this question
    
So do you need to split string in spaces (as logical point between words, and split every word, which is longer than N characters? –  Dima Apr 19 '12 at 17:25
    
No, I need to split based off the number of characters, from there I need to make sure that the character it split at was not a normal abc character. If that's the case then It needs to find the last space and split it at that point –  Alex Apr 19 '12 at 17:27
    
codereview.stackexchange.com –  L.B Apr 19 '12 at 17:31
    
Can you show an example input and output; I'm sure it would help everyone understand –  Bob2Chiv Apr 19 '12 at 17:33
    
@L.B Thanks, i didn't even know they had a code review section. –  Alex Apr 19 '12 at 18:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is a much simpler way. Something like.

int idx = 0;
while (idx < str.Length)
{
    int endIdx = idx + chunkSize;
    if (endIdx >= str.Length)
        endIdx = str.Length;
    else if (splitAtSpaces)
    {
        while (str[endIdx] != ' ')
            --endIdx;
    }
    yield return str.Substring(idx, endIdx - idx);
    idx = endIdx;
}

The idea is that you jump ahead by the chunk size and then work backwards to the previous space, if necessary.

Note that this code assumes that you won't have a single word that's larger than the chunk size. It also will split in the middle of multiple spaces. So if you have "... hello world", you might get a chunk that ends with "hello ".

share|improve this answer
    
That works great; however, how much overhead can we expect if we have something say that's 1000 characters or more? Will having the 2nd while loop hurt performance? This is something that will be done in batches of a possibility of 30K+ strings that all can be over 350 characters (my chunksize) –  Alex Apr 19 '12 at 18:08
    
In the original code, you're moving forward one character at a time through the entire chunk. This code jumps to the end of the chunk and works backwards to the last space. Your original code examines every character in the chunk. This code only examines a few characters at the end of the chunk. Also, this code doesn't spend any time building a second string. Instead, it just copies a substring. This code should be quite a bit faster than the original. –  Jim Mischel Apr 19 '12 at 18:13
    
The original I wasn't sure about performance, I kinda just through it together real quick. The only worry I have is having the double loops. Is there a way to do this without loops and improving performance on top of that? –  Alex Apr 19 '12 at 18:15
    
There's no way to do this without a loop. I think your concern with the "double loop" is unfounded. If you single-step this code in the debugger, you'll find that the inner loop is typically executed only a few times per iteration of the outer loop--just enough to find the previous space. For each chunk, the inner loop will be executed (average_word_length /2) times. Where average_word_length is the average number of characters between spaces in your text. In any case, if you think performance will be a problem, try it out. I think you'll find that it's very fast. –  Jim Mischel Apr 19 '12 at 18:26
    
Okay, I figured I was just being over cautious. Thank you for your help! :) –  Alex Apr 19 '12 at 18:30

The following should work in all cases and be faster then your suggested solution.

    public static IEnumerable<string> SplitEvery(this string str, int chunkSize, bool splitAtSpaces)
    {
        if (splitAtSpaces)
        {
            return SplitEvery_AtSpace(str, chunkSize);
        }
        else
        {
            return SplitEvery_IgnoreSpace(str, chunkSize);
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<string> SplitEvery_AtSpace(string str, int chunkSize)
    {
        int lastStartPoint = 0,
            nextStartPoint = chunkSize;
        List<string> output = new List<string>();

        for (int i = 0; i < str.Length && nextStartPoint < str.Length; i++)
        {
            while (nextStartPoint > lastStartPoint + 1 && str[nextStartPoint - 1] != ' ')
            {
                nextStartPoint--;
            }

            if (nextStartPoint == lastStartPoint)   //If no space in line break
            {
                output.Add(str.Substring(lastStartPoint, chunkSize));
                nextStartPoint += chunkSize;
            }
            else
            {
                output.Add(str.Substring(lastStartPoint, nextStartPoint - lastStartPoint - 1)); //-1 skips space
            }


            //Prep for next loop
            lastStartPoint = nextStartPoint;
            nextStartPoint += chunkSize;
        }

        if (lastStartPoint < str.Length) { output.Add(str.Substring(lastStartPoint)); } //Add leftover

        return output;  //May want to convert to array if it will be accessed often.
    }

    public static IEnumerable<string> SplitEvery_IgnoreSpace(string str, int chunkSize)
    {
        int lastInserted = 0;
        List<string> output = new List<string>();

        for (int i = 0; i < str.Length && (lastInserted + chunkSize) < str.Length; i++)
        {
            output.Add(str.Substring(lastInserted, chunkSize));

            //Prep for next loop
            lastInserted += chunkSize;
        }

        if (lastInserted < str.Length) { output.Add(str.Substring(lastInserted)); } //Add leftover

        return output;  //May want to convert to array if it will be accessed often.
    } 
  1. When posting code you want reviewed, try not to use var if you know the type. It makes the code harder to read and debug.
  2. It is usual a bad idea to concatenate to a string in a loop. Instead use a System.Text.StringBuilder.

Update: @payo and @Alex
I think you missed my point, but thanks for indicating why you down voted. Please allow me to clarify and respond.

With local variables which have built in keywords (like int, string, bool) there is no point in declaring them var as you are not saving very many key strokes.
Of course var has some good uses if, for example, the variable is anonymous, the type name is really long (like GetResponseToSuggestForTodayTrimmedNoInputResults or even ALongVarName), or you do not know the actual type of the variable.

@payo In some cases I agree that var can be easier to read, but it is also less explicit. Is i an int, byte, or long? Is currentString a string or a StringBuilder? Of course we could "Go To Definition" if the code is in a project but when posted on a website this is not an option. Also, what if the variable is initialized somewhere other then its definition? Now I have to go looking for where it is initialized to determine what the poster is trying to say, or create a new VS project and hope that it doesn't take too long to get their code sample working. As a result I stated "When posting code you want reviewed, try not to use var if you know the type." Maybe not the most accurate way to state it, but quick and easy.

@Alex You are entitled to your opinion, in my experience it is more what you are use to then as far as read ability. If you always use var then you will always look to the left if you want to know the type (and don't remember what you made it and do not want to wait for the tool tip). Of course I do take exception with your statement " It helps clean up your code and if you properly name your variables then var should not limit readability at all." as not only is this against coding convection ("Do not rely on the variable name to specify the type of the variable. It might not be correct."), you did not clearly name nextWord as it sounds like you are finding words (strings with a space on either side). Your use of var in your example (all uses) does not actually add to the readability at all. Most people who are use to using var who wanted to know a variable's type would instinctively find where it was set and attempt to guess the type from that while someone who does not use var will instinctively go to the variables definition to determine the type. In addition, not all types can be accurately inferred by an initialization, especially if you are initializing from a method.

It is important to note "In many cases the use of var is optional and is just a syntactic convenience. However, when a variable is initialized with an anonymous type you must declare the variable as var if you need to access the properties of the object at a later point." and also "The purpose of using this keyword is when you don’t know type of variable."

One more link

share|improve this answer
1  
var is AWESOME - when assigning variables to methods whose return type is not clear, using var can be confusing. But in MANY cases var simplifies and makes code more readable. –  payo Apr 19 '12 at 17:39
    
var in my opinion makes it more readable. It helps clean up your code and if you properly name your variables then var should not limit readability at all. To each their own though. –  Alex Apr 19 '12 at 18:02
1  
@payo I do not think you understood my statement. I have edited it to make it more clear. –  Trisped Apr 19 '12 at 20:25
    
@Alex I have edited my post to make it more clear. In this case I do not think it makes it more readable, though you are entitled to your own opinion. In my experience var makes things less clear and introduces unneeded risks (for example the method I use to initialize the var use to return a Button but now returns a ButtonXml with the text property overloaded to escape XML special characters). –  Trisped Apr 19 '12 at 20:28
    
@Trisped So at first your answer basically sounded like "don't ever use var" (ignoring when you have to). Now it sounds more like an opinion of when and when not to [with emphasis to not use var on websites]. I still disagree, but appreciate your response! (upvoting your comment). –  payo Apr 19 '12 at 21:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.