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I'm working on a C# .NET application that uses some rather complex scientific formulas on large sets of data (10 million data points on average). Part of what I am doing requires optimizing the formula implementations as best as possible.

I noticed that one formula implementation uses goto, and that made me wonder: is goto slower than other flow control constructs?

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4  
please do yourself a favour and don't use goto in C#!!! –  MUG4N Apr 19 '12 at 17:33
2  
@MUG4N There is nothing wrong with goto's it is how you use them that makes them evil –  GETah Apr 19 '12 at 17:36
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I voted to reopen. This is not a question about the usefulness of goto. The question was worded to ask about performance. It is a legitimate question regardless of ones personal aversion to its use. –  Brian Gideon Apr 19 '12 at 17:46
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@Servy: To be honest, I've never actually seen goto used irresponsibly. I suspect that is because 1) most junior developers are unaware of its existence and 2) the taboo of its use has made everyone else shy away (rightfully so). The only times I have seen it used (aside from code generators of course) it was done so with reasonable (though arguable) justification. –  Brian Gideon Apr 19 '12 at 18:30
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I've been around long enough that I have seen goto used irresponsibly, but that was over 20 years ago in ancient FORTRAN. I haven't seen it used irresponsibly since. Sometimes, it's the cleanest, clearest, most maintainable solution. There's absolutely nothing wrong with it and this hysteria about it is silly. –  Carey Gregory Apr 23 '12 at 17:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

is goto slower than other flow control constructs?

No. All the other flow control constructs are basically goto anyway.

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Thanks. Not sure why someone marked my question down. –  kevin628 Apr 19 '12 at 17:33
3  
It's a perfectly reasonable question. People just react viscerally when they see anything to do with goto. –  jason Apr 19 '12 at 18:34

I noticed that one formula implementation uses goto, and that made me wonder: is goto slower than other flow control constructs?

goto will not be any slower than any other flow control mechanism. It, like most flow control mechanisms get compiled into a br.s (or similar) MSIL instruction. However, there are some situations where goto can be slightly faster. They are mostly limited to situations involving the use of break and continue inside nested loops. Consider the following code.

bool condition = false;
for (int i = 0; i < BigNumber; i++)
{
    for (int j = 0; j < i; j++)
    {
        for (int k = 0; k < j; k++)
        {
            condition = Evaluate(i, j, k);
            if (condition)
            {
              // break out of everything
            }
        }
    }
}

There are different ways you could you break out of the entire thing. Here is one method.

bool condition = false;
for (int i = 0; i < BigNumber; i++)
{
    for (int j = 0; j < i; j++)
    {
        for (int k = 0; k < j; k++)
        {
            condition = Evaluate(i, j, k);
            if (condition) break;
        }
        if (condition) break;
    }
    if (condition) break;
}

The problem is that each loop must check the condition flag. We could refactor this with a goto to make it slightly more efficient and a bit more elegant to boot.

for (int i = 0; i < BigNumber; i++)
{
    for (int j = 0; j < i; j++)
    {
        for (int k = 0; k < j; k++)
        {
            if (Evaluate(i, j, k)) goto BAILOUT;
        }
    }
}
BAILOUT:
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2  
+1 for the excellent example of when goto is the cleanest, most maintainable solution. Another example is code with many potential error conditions that all use goto to bailout to a common error exit. –  Carey Gregory Apr 23 '12 at 17:45

ifs and for are translated to gotos internally by the compiler so they are not fastest than gotos

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The goto instruction in C# is no slower than any other control flow construct. In fact the vast majority of control flow constructs (if, while, for, etc ...) is implemented in terms of goto.

For example:

if (someExpr) { 
  Console.WriteLine("here");
}
Console.WriteLine("there");

Is essentially compiled down to the following

gotoIf !someExpr theLabel;
Console.WriteLine("here");
theLabel:
Console.WriteLine("there");
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