Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Need your feedback on the below code -

public static void main(String[] args) {
try {
        throw new OutOfMemoryError();
    } catch (Exception e) {
        System.out.println("Inside catch");
    } catch (Throwable t){
        System.out.println("Inside catch throwable");
    }finally {
        System.out.println("Inside finally");
    }
}

Here I am throwing an OutOfMemoryError object (using new operator) from try clause & catching Throwable object. So I get the output "Inside catch throwable" & "Inside finally". But since we are throwing OutofMemError shouldn't the code exit (i.e. without going to Throwable & finally)? In actual practical project, if we get OutOfMemoryError, the application just exits... why this difference?

share|improve this question
    
this is why you don't catch Throwable –  ratchet freak Apr 19 '12 at 17:57
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In general, Errors can be caught too (unless they crash the VM or something), and Java 6 onwards allows catching OutOfMemoryError.

share|improve this answer
add comment

enter image description here

OutOfMemoryError is a sub-class of Error class which is a sub-class of Throwable class. and this is why it prints out:

Inside catch throwable

share|improve this answer
add comment

No, the code won't exit, because you are swallowing the exception. The 'traditional Java program' you described crashes on this kind of error because the exception is not handled. You can test this yourself by installing a default exception handler on the main thread of your program.

Thread.setDefaultUncaughtExceptionHandler(new UncaughtExceptionHandler() {

   @Override
   public void uncaughtException(Thread t, Throwable e) {
      e.printStackTrace(System.err);
   }
});

throw new OutOfMemoryError();
share|improve this answer
add comment

It doesn't matter what exception or error or sub-class of Throwable (which doesn't have to be an exception or an error) you can catch the Throwable.

Nothing can cause the thread to exit exception System.exit(0); try that instead.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.