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How can i prevent a class from from being inherited without using Sealed Keyword?

Thanks in advance.

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7  
I don't think you can, at least easily. What do you have against the sealed keyword? –  Tim Apr 19 '12 at 18:07
10  
What next - how to inherit from a class without using the ':' character? :-) –  Danny Varod Apr 19 '12 at 18:08
3  
Huh? How can I drive a car without using the pedals? –  SLaks Apr 19 '12 at 18:09
    
Are you talking about preventing third-party users of your code from inheriting from the class? Or would you like to keep other developers on the project from inheriting from it? –  phoog Apr 19 '12 at 18:10
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5 Answers

In your class's constructor:

public MyUnsealedClass()
{
  if (this.GetType() != typeof(MyUnsealedClass))
      throw new Exception("Don't do that");
}

Why not use the sealed keyword though?

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3  
so many upvotes to throw an exception in the ctor....I must be missing something –  payo Apr 19 '12 at 18:22
    
@Steve I agree. Your solution definitely seems best. –  Joshua Apr 19 '12 at 18:41
    
I agree throwing an exception is the constructor is much less than ideal and very taboo. –  Matthew Sanford Apr 19 '12 at 18:50
1  
Sure this solution is less than ideal, C# makes a keyword for this purpose. The comments definitely indicate that (as do I in my answer). So given a wild constraint like this, it takes a little brainstorming to come up with this, but it would certainly work, would it not? –  Steve Danner Apr 19 '12 at 18:57
1  
@ach, you are wrong about that. From MSDN (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173115(VS.80).aspx): In a derived class, if a base-class constructor is not called explicitly using the base keyword, then the default constructor, if there is one, is called implicitly. –  Steve Danner Apr 19 '12 at 20:54
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Another way is you can make a static method that returns an object of your type and then make the constructor private. This has the advantage that it will create a compile time error instead of a run time error.

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You can use private constructors

class Base
{
  private Base() {}
}

class Derived : Base
{
  // derp
}

Then provide a utility to creaet Base objects (like static methods on Base that have access to the private ctor

class Base
{
  private Base() {}

  public static Base CreateBase() { return new Base(); }
}

Also, if you want to be able to derive from this class, but you don't want other people doing that, you can make your class internal (or even the ctor internal)

class Base
{
  internal Base() { }
}

class Derived : Base
{
}

// in another assembly

class MyOwnDerived : Base
{
  // derp
}
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You can achieve this by using private constructor, something along the lines:

public class NonInheritableClass
{
    static NonInheritableClass GetObject()
    {
        return new NonInheritableClass();
    }

    private NonInheritableClass()
    { 
    }
}
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Throwing an exception in the constructor will work.

I agree though - why not use sealed? It's there for that reason.

Unless you' are trying to do something else, and if that's the case, there is probably a better solution too.

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