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What is the most performant way to build strings from strings, integers and floats? currently I'm doing this and it uses a lot of cpu time.

String frame = this.frameTime + ":" +
    this.player.vertices[0].x + "," +
    this.player.vertices[0].y + "," +
    this.player.activeAnimId + "," +
    (int)this.player.virtualSpeed + "," +
    this.map.getCurrentTime() + 
    (this.player.frameSound == -1 ? "" : "," + this.player.frameSound) +
    (this.player.frameDecal.equals("") ? "" : "," + this.player.frameDecal) +
    ";";

Is there a way to do this faster?

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Have you tried StringBuilder? –  Brian Hoover Apr 19 '12 at 18:17
    
Have you tried String.format() ? –  Words Like Jared Apr 19 '12 at 18:18
1  
@BrianHoover This uses StringBuilder. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 19 '12 at 18:24
    
See this post for an explanation.rationaljava.com/2015/02/the-optimum-method-to-concatenate.html –  Dan Feb 17 at 19:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

That should already be fast - it'll use StringBuilder internally for concatenation. Arguably using StringBuilder explicitly could eliminate the concatenation of empty strings, but it's not likely to make a big difference.

How often are you doing this, anyway? It must be pretty often, for it to be a bottleneck... do you really need to do it that often?

EDIT: For those who are saying "Use StringBuilder, it'll be faster" - consider this code:

public class Test
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        int x = 10;
        int y = 20;
        int z = 30;
        String foo = x + "," + y + "," + z + ";";
        System.out.println(foo);
    }
}

Compile that, then use javap -c to see what the compiler generates...

share|improve this answer
    
That was my thought as well - although I'm not clear in what cases this will happen. Is it when you use the + operator in a loop that the compiler won't convert? –  JavaKungFu Apr 19 '12 at 18:22
    
you could initialize the builder with a capacity you know is enough (but such a short string this won't gain much). also why do you need this, logging? –  ratchet freak Apr 19 '12 at 18:22
    
it's done in every frame of my game –  Andreas Linden Apr 19 '12 at 18:23
    
@zolex: Do you really need to do this on every frame? Really? Whose benefit is this for? –  Jon Skeet Apr 19 '12 at 18:24
1  
@zolex: Eek, you're calling getBytes() using the default encoding. Please don't do that. Use an OutputStreamWriter instead if you really need a string representation. But why not use DataOutputStream to write just the binary data you want to record? No string conversion required. –  Jon Skeet Apr 19 '12 at 19:18

You could try using a StringBuilder.

(However, most Java compilers worth their salt will automatically optimize the code you've listed to use StringBuilder behind the scenes.)

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If you want it to go really fast you can try my library which allows you to log messages in under a micro-second without creating any garbage. https://github.com/peter-lawrey/Java-Chronicle

(As I say, it likely to be over the top for what you want)

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Use a StringBuilder.

String string = new StringBuilder("abcd").append(23).append(false).append("xyz").toString();
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2  
Why do you believe that would be faster, out of interest? –  Jon Skeet Apr 19 '12 at 18:19

concat3 method as below works fastest for me, performance for concat1 is jvm implementation/optimization dependent, it may perform better in other version of JVM but on my windows machine and remote linux red hat machine i tested on shows concat3 works the fastest ..

public class StringConcat {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int run = 100 * 1000 * 1000;
    long startTime, total = 0;

    final String a = "aafswerg";
    final String b = "assdfsaf";
    final String c = "aasfasfsaf";
    final String d = "afafafdaa";
    final String e = "afdassadf";

    startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    concat1(run, a, b, c, d, e);
    total = System.currentTimeMillis() - startTime;
    System.out.println(total);

    startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    concat2(run, a, b, c, d, e);
    total = System.currentTimeMillis() - startTime;
    System.out.println(total);

    startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    concat3(run, a, b, c, d, e);
    total = System.currentTimeMillis() - startTime;
    System.out.println(total);
}

private static void concat3(int run, String a, String b, String c, String d, String e) {
    for (int i = 0; i < run; i++) {
        String str = new StringBuilder(a.length() + b.length() + c.length() + d.length() + e.length()).append(a)
                .append(b).append(c).append(d).append(e).toString();
    }
}

private static void concat2(int run, String a, String b, String c, String d, String e) {
    for (int i = 0; i < run; i++) {
        String str = new StringBuilder(a).append(b).append(c).append(d).append(e).toString();
    }
}

private static void concat1(int run, String a, String b, String c, String d, String e) {
    for (int i = 0; i < run; i++) {
        String str = a + b + c + d + e;
    }
}
}
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this program do it in practice to show which apprach is the fastest. and can be tested while running. please let me know why downvotes. –  leoismyname Sep 5 '13 at 22:44

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