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Something like these:

1234.5678
2345.6789
3456.7890

But not:

123.4567

Right now I do this:

double number = Math.Ceiling ( random.NextDouble ( ) * 10000000 ) * 0.001;

but that doesn't always give me 8 digits.

Any clever tricks to do this?

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1  
Given that the vast majority of decimal fractions have no exact representation when stored as double, you really should be using the Decimal type for this. –  spender Apr 19 '12 at 19:12
    
It is important that it has uniform distribution? –  Servy Apr 19 '12 at 19:12
    
@spender: How do you mean? I just use them as seeders for other random functions. Is this not efficient? –  Joan Venge Apr 19 '12 at 19:14
1  
The problem you are trying to solve is one that is based on on decimal representation of numbers. The double datatype does not store its value as a decimal. It's stored as a binary mantissa and exponent. The set of numbers that can be represented perfectly using this representation is a different set to those that can stored perfectly using decimal representations. –  spender Apr 19 '12 at 19:18
1  
From en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_numeral_system#Fractions_in_binary - 1/10 does not have a finite binary representation, and this causes 10 × 0.1 not to be precisely equal to 1 in floating point arithmetic. –  spender Apr 19 '12 at 19:23
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8 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Try random.Next(10000000, 99999999+1) / 10000.0d;

EDIT: added more 9s

EDIT2: fixed the 1 minus issue

EDIT3: added more 0s, how the hell did my answer get upvoted so much?

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var n = random.Next(min, max) generates a number n with min <= n < max, so using 9999999 instead of 9999999+1 isn't what you actually want (though you're unlikely to practically care in this case). –  Tim S. Apr 19 '12 at 19:12
    
Yes, you're right. –  Matthew Apr 19 '12 at 19:12
1  
@JoanVenge the 1 minus issue is the fact that the upper limit of the range you specify is exclusive. In other words, Random.Next(10, 99) returns an integer between 10 and 98. The correct call to get a random 2-digit integer would be Random.Next(10, 100). –  phoog Apr 19 '12 at 19:21
1  
This seems to generate more digits than 4 for the integer part. Can you please check? –  Joan Venge Apr 19 '12 at 19:23
1  
@JoanVenge you're right, should be divided by 10,000 –  Matthew Apr 19 '12 at 19:33
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Use one of these:

double number = Math.Ceiling(random.NextDouble() * 9000 * 10000 + 1000 * 10000) * 0.0001;
double number = Math.Ceiling(random.NextDouble() * 90000000 + 10000000) * 0.0001;
double number = random.Next(10000 * 10000 / 10, 10000 * 10000) / 10000d;
double number = random.Next(10000000, 100000000) / 10000d;
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Something like this?

Random r = new Random();
var item = r.Next(10000000, 100000000) * 0.0001m;

Per spender's comment below... explanation as to why you I use decimal here:

  1. Jon Skeet publicly shamed many of us for choosing double at one of his talks at Codemash in Ohio.
  2. Doubles are used by hipsters, and
  3. Decimal will prevent precision issues that are introduced by the use of double. Keep in mind that when you need lots of digits after the dot, you should use double. If you need less, but need them to maintain accuracy, use decimal.
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1  
probably worth explaining why you chose decimal for this calculation. –  spender Apr 19 '12 at 19:13
    
Done. Good point. –  Robaticus Apr 19 '12 at 19:25
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Generate 8 single random digits and then concatenate them together.

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1  
Requires a parsing step. Slow. –  usr Apr 19 '12 at 19:09
2  
@usr - No parsing required. It can all be done with math. –  Justin Niessner Apr 19 '12 at 19:11
    
I don't think it would be uniformly random. –  Servy Apr 19 '12 at 19:13
2  
@Servy as long as the first digit is between 1 and 9, you should get the same distribution. Assembling digits gives you 9 * 10 * 10 * 10 * 10 * 10 * 10 * 10 == 9E8 possible results, and picking a number between 1E8 and 1E9 - 1 gives you 1E9 - 1E8 == 9E8 possible results. –  phoog Apr 19 '12 at 19:24
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double number = random.Next(1000 * 1000, 1000 * 1000 * 10) / 1000.0
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double rndNumber = new Random().NextDouble(); 
string testNumber = (rndNumber * 99999999).ToString("0000.0000"); 
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Random rnd = new Random();
int num1 = rnd.Next(1000,9999);
int num2 = rnd.Next(1000,9999);
Console.WriteLine(num1.ToString()+"."+num2.ToString());
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double number = Double.Parse(r.Next(10000000, 99999999).ToString().Insert(4,"."));
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