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I am using this as a sub select (in a simple query joining 2 other tables) and as you can imagine it takes a while to run. going on 6 hours+ so far. is this the only way to do this? I know that doing another JOIN instead of a sub select might help a bit. but the main bottleneck is all these OR's and sub-strings.

SELECT ex_array
FROM   service_x 
WHERE  
   ( substr(ex_array,1,2) = 'FW' OR substr(ex_array,3,2) = 'FW' OR substr(ex_array,5,2) = 'FW' OR substr(ex_array,7,2) = 'FW' OR substr(ex_array,9,2) = 'FW' OR substr(ex_array,11,2) = 'FW' ) 
OR ( substr(ex_array,1,2) = 'IL' OR substr(ex_array,3,2) = 'IL' OR substr(ex_array,5,2) = 'IL' OR substr(ex_array,7,2) = 'IL' OR substr(ex_array,9,2) = 'IL' OR substr(ex_array,11,2) = 'IL' )  
OR ( substr(ex_array,1,2) = 'IN' OR substr(ex_array,3,2) = 'IN' OR substr(ex_array,5,2) = 'IN' OR substr(ex_array,7,2) = 'IN' OR substr(ex_array,9,2) = 'IN' OR substr(ex_array,11,2) = 'IN' )  
OR ( substr(ex_array,1,2) = 'IK' OR substr(ex_array,3,2) = 'IK' OR substr(ex_array,5,2) = 'IK' OR substr(ex_array,7,2) = 'IK' OR substr(ex_array,9,2) = 'IK' OR substr(ex_array,11,2) = 'IK' )  
OR ( substr(ex_array,1,2) = 'IH' OR substr(ex_array,3,2) = 'IH' OR substr(ex_array,5,2) = 'IH' OR substr(ex_array,7,2) = 'IH' OR substr(ex_array,9,2) = 'IH' OR substr(ex_array,11,2) = 'IH' )  
OR ( substr(ex_array,1,2) = 'KP' OR substr(ex_array,3,2) = 'KP' OR substr(ex_array,5,2) = 'KP' OR substr(ex_array,7,2) = 'KP' OR substr(ex_array,9,2) = 'KP' OR substr(ex_array,11,2) = 'KP' )  
)
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Do you have an explain plan for the query (check out dbms_xplan to obtain this)? I expect the query is being satisfied by a full table scan since you have stopped the database using any standard indexes by applying the function to ex_array. The six function based indexes suggested by @dcp would possibly help. How many rows does service_x have, and what percentage of rows do you expect to be returned by your query? You may need to reevaluate your overall algorithm/design to get the performance you require. The key though will likely be to enable an index access, depending on query selectivity. –  mathewbutler Apr 19 '12 at 21:10
    
about 12.2 million rows (in service_x) and I should be getting about 175,000 results back. –  user1344919 Apr 19 '12 at 23:18
    
Given the high selectivity of the query - I suggest that if you are unable to tune the whole algorithm your best option is to modify the query to enable an efficient filter of rows via an index access to ex_array. I'll post an answer below that may help. –  mathewbutler Apr 20 '12 at 20:18

4 Answers 4

One thing you could try would be using a function based index. Specifically, create function based indexes on substr(ex_array,3,2) and substr(ex_array,9,2), etc.

It might be a lot of indexes though, so you'll have to weigh how much it helps by running some tests. But it's an idea to start with.

I assume you are on 8i or later.

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yes. using version 10g –  user1344919 Apr 19 '12 at 22:09

how about this structure...

INSTR( ex_array, 'FW' ) IN (1,3,5,7,9,11)

then at least you'll only be doing the string parsing once...

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this method is actually the fastest so far out of using regular expressions, doing it my way, and doing it this way. –  user1344919 Apr 19 '12 at 22:48
    
@mathewbutler my way above takes 183.33 seconds regular expressions takes 511.89 seconds INSTR+IN method takes 155.46 seconds –  user1344919 Apr 19 '12 at 23:35
    
Yes, but once you'll have an index you will see the real improvment. Check after having it (them) ... –  A.B.Cade Apr 20 '12 at 3:59
    
agreed, function based index should help all 3 –  Randy Apr 20 '12 at 12:42
    
I don't think that this is semantically the same as the query originally posted. It only checks for one case. –  mathewbutler Apr 20 '12 at 19:53

Maybe with regexp_like:

REGEXP_LIKE(ex_array, '^(.{2}){0,5}(FW|IL|IN|IK|IH|KP).*$')

(the regular expression can probably be written better ...)

You can also add a function based index as dcp suggested (though you'll need only one):

create index fbIndex on service_x (REGEXP_INSTR(ex_array, '^(.{2}){0,5}(FW|IL|IN|IK|IH|KP).*$'));

and the change the query to use:

REGEXP_INSTR(ex_array, '^(.{2}){0,5}(FW|IL|IN|IK|IH|KP).*$') = 1
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That's good, but as @mathewbutler said - the real improvement will be when there will be an index –  A.B.Cade Apr 19 '12 at 22:17
    
Just take care that you are comparing queries thst have the same functionality. A query plan would be valuable to compare the two runtime behaviour of the queries. –  mathewbutler Apr 20 '12 at 19:54

Given the information available I'd suggest, given the selectivity of the query that you need:

1) An index on ex_array (preferably just ex_array, or with ex_array on the leading edge of the index.

2) to modify the query. If you append additional filter criteria:

... and (Ex_array like '%FW%' OR ex_array like '%IL%' or ex_aray like .... Etc covering each of the six cases. With the index in place this should enable an index range scan to reduce the the 12.2 million rows to only those that contain one of the six strings you are interested in. Only these rows will then have your substr logic applied, leaving the expected 175K.

In principle this should improve efficiency. It does depend greatly on the data distribution though (it's possible for example that all 12 million rows contain one of the six strings, just not in the places specified in the original query. in this case my suggested changes might be less efficient than the original query). There may be other options but I'd need more information, including explain plans to be more precise.

Hope this helps - good luck!!

share|improve this answer
    
oh great. this whole thing just got more complicated. there can be multiple rows of data for any one relationship (to another table). I actually need to pull ALL the data/rows (up to 5 extra rows) if any ONE of the multiple rows contains ONE of these values. (not just the row that has the found value) –  user1344919 Apr 23 '12 at 19:18

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