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I am trying to understand what is the difference between the following constructors in java in class

Box
{
    Box(Box ob)
    {
     width = ob.width;
     height = ob.height;
     depth = ob.depth;
    }

    Box(double w, double h, double d)
    {
     width = w;
     height = h;
     depth = d;
    }

    Box()
    {
     width = 0;
     height = 0;
     depth = 0;

    }

    Box(double width, double height, double depth)
    {
     this.width = width;
     this.height = height;
     this.depth = depth;
    }
}

Cheers everyone

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closed as not a real question by nes1983, birryree, Dan J, Andy Thomas, Perception Apr 19 '12 at 22:30

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Can you be more specific? –  Dimitri Apr 19 '12 at 19:48
    
They take different parameters? Number 2 and 4 seem to be redundant, by the way. –  Niklas B. Apr 19 '12 at 19:48
    
Your 2nd and 4th one are syntactically the same. –  Kirk Woll Apr 19 '12 at 19:49
    
The 2nd and 4th constructors are the same (same signature, Box(double, double, double)). But what do you really want to know? –  birryree Apr 19 '12 at 19:49
    
is there any difference if you are using the first, third or the last one ? –  Kiril Apr 19 '12 at 19:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First is the copy constructor which is used to copy the values of one object to another during initialization.

Second and Fourth is a parametrized constructor which contains all the data members of the class. But it is recomended to use the fourth and most of the IDE(all that I know) will auto generate the 4th as it is easier to read and has the same context

Third is a default constructor. Used to set default values. See it does not take any inputs(as parameter)

Box b = new Box();//Default constructor
Box b1 = new Box(1.0,2.0,3.0);//Parameterized constructor completely defining the object
Box b2 = new Box(b1);//Copy constructor will copy the values but both will have a different reference
b2 = b1;//b2 now refers to object referenced by b1. So the earlier reference for b2 will be taken by GC(garbage Collector)
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if we say b1 = b2 are we going to assign the reference of b2 to b1 and to point to the same reference ? –  Kiril Apr 19 '12 at 20:07
    
yes. Hope my edit clarifies further –  Nitin Chhajer Apr 19 '12 at 20:14
    
They point to the same object. –  dragon66 Apr 19 '12 at 20:15
    
@dragon66 Out of the topic but I have stopped the usage of point(or pointer) ever since I moved on from C/C++ to Java :) –  Nitin Chhajer Apr 19 '12 at 20:18

The first one is often called a copy-contructor, which means you are copying values from an existing instance into the new one. The 2nd and 4th (which are the same), are creating a new instance, initializing each field from explicit primitive values. The third one appears to be an attempt at creating an instance with default values for fields, when you don't want to have to supply any explicitly.

Btw, the trivial difference between 2nd and 4th is that in the 2nd you are using different names for the parameters than the field names, so you don't have to say "this.fieldname" on the lefthand side. In the 4th one, the parameters have the same names as the field names, and so you have to use "this,fieldname" on lefthand side to indicate that you are copying from the parameter to the field, rather than vice-versa (or from the parameter to itself, or from the field to itself).

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Ok, i am starting with an assumption that you did not write class keyword with Box and width,height and depth deceleration just to save typing.

In Java, if you do not give any constructor, a default constructor is there by default that does not take any parameters. So if you did not write anything in class Box like below you would still be able to call its basic constructor in main:

class Box{
}

class CallingClass{
    public static void main(String args[]){
        Box box = new Box(); // this would work.
    }
}

If you provide even one other constructor, then default constructor is not available anymore.

class Box{
    public Double height;

    public Box(Double height){
        this.height = height;
    }
}

class CallingClass{
    public static void main(String args[]){
        Box box = new Box((double)50); // this would work.
        Box anotherBox = new Box(); // this will give you an error.
    }
}

Quickly over construtors:

public Box(){...} // default constructor in which you allow caller to not worry about initialization.

public Box(Box boxToCopy){...} // copy constructor for creating a new box from the values of an old one.

public Box(double height, double width, double depth){...} // should create a box with specified dimensions.

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