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it seems to me that i get poor performance using the following SupervisedExecutor and ExecutorSuperviser implementation of my own, What do you think can be unefficient in this code? I want to learn how can i improve its effciency.

ExecutorSuperviser Class:

public class ExecutorSuperviser {
private SupervisedExecutor[] threadPool;
private int poolSize = 0;
private LinkedList<Runnable> q;\\my own implementation of linkedlist
public ExecutorSuperviser(int nThreads) {
    threadPool=new SupervisedExecutor[poolSize=nThreads];
    q=new LinkedList<Runnable>();
    init();
}
public void execute(Runnable r) { 
    synchronized (q) {
        q.addToTail(r);
    }
    for (int i=0;i<poolSize;i++) 
            if (!threadPool[i].isBusy()) {
                if (!threadPool[i].isAlive()) threadPool[i].start();
                threadPool[i].interrupt();
                return;
            }


}
private void init() {
    for (int i=0;i<poolSize;i++) {
        threadPool[i]=new SupervisedExecutor(this);
    }

}
public Object getLock() {
    return q;
}
public Runnable getTask() {
    return q.removeHead();
}
public void terminate() {
    for (int i=0;i<poolSize;i++) 
        threadPool[i].terminate();
}
public void waitUntilFinished() {
    while (!isFinished()) {
        try {
            Thread.sleep(Thread.MAX_PRIORITY);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {}
    }
}
private boolean isFinished() {
    for (int i=0;i<poolSize;i++) 
        if (threadPool[i].isBusy()) return false;
    return q.isEmpty();
}

}

SupervisedExecutor Class:

public class SupervisedExecutor extends Thread {
    private boolean   terminated = false;
    private Boolean busy = false;
    private ExecutorSuperviser boss;
    SupervisedExecutor (ExecutorSuperviser boss) {
        this.boss=boss;
    }
    public void run() {
        while (!terminated) {
            try {
                sleep(MAX_PRIORITY);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                synchronized (busy) {
                    busy=true;
                }
                Runnable r;
                while (true) {
                    synchronized (boss.getLock()) {
                        r=boss.getTask();
                    }
                    if (r!=null) r.run();
                    else break;
                } 
                synchronized (busy) {
                    busy=false;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    public boolean isBusy() {
        boolean isBusy;
        synchronized (boss.getLock()) {
            isBusy=busy;
        }
        return isBusy;
    }
    public void terminate() {
        terminated=true;
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
Have you tried comparing it with the built-in concurrency library e.g. ExecutorService? How is your implementation better? –  Peter Lawrey Apr 19 '12 at 20:59
    
i didnt say its better, it just offers what ExecutorService does not, which is the ability to waitUntilFinished(), which means the calling thread can wait untill all runnable that were sent to get executed are finished running... basiclly im just trying to get better in Coding java, so it was just for learnning... –  Ofek Ron Apr 19 '12 at 21:02
    
Instead of waiting to 10 ms, I would try using a state change with wait/notify or use a thread safe queue. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 19 '12 at 21:17
    
there are 2 sleeps in the code, one of them is for the calling to waitUntilFinished(), so i assume you arent reffering to it, and the second one is meant to be interrupted... –  Ofek Ron Apr 19 '12 at 21:26
    
Does [awaitTermination][1] does not do what you want? [1]:docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/… –  Guillaume Polet Apr 19 '12 at 21:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How about the following solution which has the following advantages:

  1. As a subclass of ThreadPoolExecutor, you don't have to re-implement everything which ThreadPoolExecutor does for you just to get the waitUntilFinished() functionality that you're after.

  2. By taking advantage of ReentrantLock, Condition, and await()/signal() you avoid busy waiting, which can certainly hurt performance.

This implementation works by taking advantage of the beforeExecute() and afterExecute() methods which ThreadPoolExecutor exposes to keep our own count of active tasks. I don't use getActiveCount() because, according to the JavaDoc, it doesn't guarantee an exact answer (although perhaps in the case of ThreadPoolExecutor it does provide an exact answer, I'd need to research further to be sure).

import java.util.concurrent.BlockingQueue;
import java.util.concurrent.LinkedBlockingQueue;
import java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor;
import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;
import java.util.concurrent.locks.Condition;
import java.util.concurrent.locks.ReentrantLock;

public class WaitableThreadPoolExecutor extends ThreadPoolExecutor
{
    private Condition waitCondition;
    private ReentrantLock lock;
    private int taskCount = 0;

    public WaitableThreadPoolExecutor( int corePoolSize, int maximumPoolSize, long keepAliveTime, TimeUnit unit, BlockingQueue<Runnable> workQueue )
    {
        super( corePoolSize, maximumPoolSize, keepAliveTime, unit, workQueue );

        lock = new ReentrantLock( );
        waitCondition = lock.newCondition( );
    }

    // if isEmpty() is true, then there is no need to block
    // otherwise, wait until waitCondition is signaled
    public void waitUntilFinished( )
    {
        lock.lock( );
        try
        {
            while ( !isEmpty( ) )
                waitCondition.await( );
        }
        catch ( InterruptedException e )
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        finally
        {
            lock.unlock( );
        }
    }

    // the ThreadPool is empty if our taskCount is 0 and the
    // work queue is empty (this may not be bullet-proof, for one
    // thing, I'm hesitant to use getActiveCount() because it
    // does not guarantee an exact answer
    protected boolean isEmpty( )
    {
        lock.lock( );
        try
        {
            return taskCount == 0 && getQueue( ).isEmpty( );
        }
        finally
        {
            lock.unlock( );
        }
    }

    // increment our task count before executing each task
    @Override
    protected void beforeExecute( Thread t, Runnable r )
    {
        super.beforeExecute( t, r );

        lock.lock( );
        try
        {
            taskCount += 1;
        }
        finally
        {
            lock.unlock( );
        }
    }

    // decrement our task count after executing each task
    // then, if the pool is empty, signal anyone waiting
    // on the waitCondition
    @Override
    protected void afterExecute( Runnable r, Throwable t )
    {
        super.afterExecute( r, t );

        lock.lock( );
        try
        {
            taskCount -= 1;

            if ( isEmpty( ) ) waitCondition.signalAll( );
        }
        finally
        {
            lock.unlock( );
        }
    }

    public static void main( String[] args )
    {
        WaitableThreadPoolExecutor pool = new WaitableThreadPoolExecutor( 2, 4, 5000, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS, new LinkedBlockingQueue<Runnable>( ) );

        for ( int i = 0 ; i < 10 ; i++ )
        {
            final int threadId = i;

            pool.execute( new Runnable( )
            {
                @Override
                public void run( )
                {
                    try { Thread.sleep( (int) ( Math.random( ) * 5000 ) ); } catch ( InterruptedException e ) { }

                    System.out.println( threadId + " done." );
                }
            });
        }

        pool.waitUntilFinished( );

        System.out.println( "Done waiting." );
    }
}

I included a simple main() method which you can use as a test case. It starts 10 threads which wait a random amount of time before printing that they are done. Then the main thread calls waitUntilFinished().

The results will look something like (the main point being that Done waiting. will always be printed last:

1 done.
2 done.
0 done.
4 done.
3 done.
5 done.
7 done.
8 done.
6 done.
9 done.
Done waiting.
share|improve this answer
    
beautifull implementation i liked it. thanks! –  Ofek Ron Apr 20 '12 at 4:40

Personally, I find using the plain ExecutorService shorter and easier.

Note: This is ALL the code you need.

ExecutorService es = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();

List<Future<Void>>futures = new ArrayList<Future<Void>>();
for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    final int threadId = i;
    futures.add(es.submit(new Callable<Void>() {
        @Override
        public Void call() throws InterruptedException {
            Thread.sleep((int) (Math.random() * 1000));
            System.out.println(threadId + " done.");
            return null;
        }
    }));
}
for (Future<Void> future : futures)
    future.get();
System.out.println("Done waiting.");

es.shutdown();

prints

2 done.
4 done.
7 done.
6 done.
8 done.
5 done.
9 done.
1 done.
3 done.
0 done.
Done waiting.
share|improve this answer

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