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I have:

Command *command;

if(commandType == "Start")
{
  command = new StartCommand();
}
else if (commandType == "Stop")
{
  command = new StopCommand();
}

Now suppose I want command to be a shared_ptr, how do I translate the code above to use a shared_ptr?

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1  
Substitute Command* with shared_ptr<Command>? (And preferrably new XXXCommand() with make_shared<XXXCommand>().) –  Xeo Apr 19 '12 at 21:27
1  
std::shared_ptr<Command> command;, and then when assigning, do command.reset(new StartCommand) (or the other one)? –  birryree Apr 19 '12 at 21:28
    
@birryree: Thanks I think it was the reset function I was looking for. –  User Apr 19 '12 at 21:30
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Skipping the obvious, if you want to properly initialise your variable, e.g. if it's const, you could do it like this

std::shared_ptr<Command> factoryCommand(std::string const& commandType) {
  if(commandType == "Start")
    return std::make_shared<StartCommand>();
  if(commandType == "Stop")
    return std::make_shared<StopCommand>();
  return std::shared_ptr<Command>(nullptr);
}

std::shared_ptr<Command> const command {factoryCommand(commandType)};

As indicated in the comments, you can also violate the RAII guideline of C++ and separate definition and initialisation. I would still prefer to use std::shared_ptr<Command>::operator= over std::shared_ptr<Command>::reset though, as it is more intuitive and doesn't trick you into newing something you will never delete.

So, for the "Start" branch, for example, this would look like this:

std::shared_ptr<Command> command;
//...
// I would flag this in the review process as "you're doing it wrong"
command.reset(new StartCommand());
// This is what you should do if you *have* to separate definition and initialisation:
command = std::make_shared<StartCommand>();
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+1 Alternatively (worse, just for completion): factoryCommand.reset( new XXXCommand() ). –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 19 '12 at 22:00
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas: Actually I was first thinking of posting this with an immediately called lambda instead of factoryCommand, but that wouldn't have helped to clarify the actual issue, so the function got a name. –  bitmask Apr 19 '12 at 22:26
    
Although my example suggested it, I wasn't only interested in the factory pattern. I guess my question was truly how to assign to a shared_ptr. If you add the example of using the reset function to your answer I'll accept it. –  User Apr 19 '12 at 23:44
    
"violate the RAII guideline of C++" That doesn't break RAII. Well, it breaks what the RAII acronym is literally about, but RAII is more interested in the cleanup than the acquisition. It's still exception safe, and it's still stack-bound, so it will still be cleaned up. So what's bad about it? It's no different than creating an empty vector and filling it with stuff later. –  Nicol Bolas Apr 20 '12 at 5:27
    
@NicolBolas: Well, perhaps it's personal taste, then. But I don't see why variables that will only be written to once, near their definition, should be non-const. –  bitmask Apr 20 '12 at 11:58
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Some very simple changes will do the job:

shared_ptr<Command> command;

if(commandType == "Start")
{
  command = make_shared<StartCommand>();
}
else if (commandType == "Stop")
{
  command = make_shared<StopCommand>();
}
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