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Background

Users can type in a name and the system should match the text, even if the either the user input or the database field contains accented (UTF-8) characters. This is using the pg_trgm module.

Problem

The code resembles the following:

  SELECT
    t.label
  FROM
    the_table t
  WHERE
    label % 'fil'
  ORDER BY
    similarity( t.label, 'fil' ) DESC

When the user types fil, the query matches filbert but not filé powder. (Because of the accented character?)

Failed Solution #1

I tried to implement an unaccent function and rewrite the query as:

  SELECT
    t.label
  FROM
    the_table t
  WHERE
    unaccent( label ) % unaccent( 'fil' )
  ORDER BY
    similarity( unaccent( t.label ), unaccent( 'fil' ) ) DESC

This returns only filbert.

Failed Solution #2

As suggested:

CREATE EXTENSION pg_trgm;
CREATE EXTENSION unaccent;

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION unaccent_text(text)
  RETURNS text AS
$BODY$
  SELECT unaccent($1); 
$BODY$
  LANGUAGE sql IMMUTABLE
  COST 1;

All other indexes on the table have been dropped. Then:

CREATE INDEX label_unaccent_idx 
ON the_table( lower( unaccent_text( label ) ) );

This returns only one result:

  SELECT
    t.label
  FROM
    the_table t
  WHERE
    label % 'fil'
  ORDER BY
    similarity( t.label, 'fil' ) DESC

Question

What is the best way to rewrite the query to ensure that both results are returned?

Thank you!

Related

http://wiki.postgresql.org/wiki/What%27s_new_in_PostgreSQL_9.0#Unaccent_filtering_dictionary

http://postgresql.1045698.n5.nabble.com/index-refuses-to-build-td5108810.html

share|improve this question
    
Are all your searches left anchored? If so, good old LIKE will serve you well in combination with an index using text_pattern_ops (and your unaccent function). I wrote more about that here. Also, are you aware of the PostgreSQL unaccent module? –  Erwin Brandstetter Apr 19 '12 at 22:11
    
Why are you using unaccent on the literal without accents, instead of the column containing the accents? I hope you used the unaccent function in defining the index, too. If so, it won't think it can use the index without using the same function on the search conditions. –  kgrittn Apr 19 '12 at 22:20
    
The searches are not left anchored. I didn't know about the unaccent module. I'll look into unaccenting the index. I mistyped the unaccent call, the failed solution now reflects reality. –  Dave Jarvis Apr 19 '12 at 22:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are not using the operator class provided by the pg_trgm module. I would create an index like this:

CREATE INDEX label_Lower_unaccent_trgm_idx
ON test_trgm USING gist (lower(unaccent_text(label)) gist_trgm_ops);

Originally, I had a GIN index here, but I later learned that a GiST is probably even better suited for this kind of query because it can return values sorted by similarity. More details:

Your query has to match the index expression to be able to make use of it.

SELECT label
FROM   the_table
WHERE  lower(unaccent_text(label)) % 'fil'
ORDER  BY similarity(label, 'fil') DESC -- it's ok to use original string here

However, "filbert" and "filé powder" are not actually very similar to "fil" according to the % operator. I suspect what you really want is this:

SELECT label
FROM   the_table
WHERE  lower(unaccent_text(label)) ~~ '%fil%'
ORDER  BY similarity(label, 'fil') DESC -- it's ok to use original string here

This will find all strings containing the search string, and sort the best matches according to the % operator first.

And the juicy part: the expression can use a GIN or GiST index since PostgreSQL 9.1! I quote the manual on the pg_trgm moule:

Beginning in PostgreSQL 9.1, these index types also support index searches for LIKE and ILIKE, for example


If you actually meant to use the % operator:

Have you tried lowering the threshold for the similarity operator % with set_limit():

SELECT set_limit(0.1);

or even lower? The default is 0.3. Just to see whether its the threshold that filters additional matches.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, Erwin; it may have been the set_limit. –  Dave Jarvis Apr 19 '12 at 23:18
    
@DaveJarvis: After recent test results, I amended my answer to use a GiST index instead of GIN. May be of interest to you. (Reposted with link.) –  Erwin Brandstetter Aug 5 '12 at 3:48

A solution for PostgreSQL 9.1:

-- Install the requisite extensions.
CREATE EXTENSION pg_trgm;
CREATE EXTENSION unaccent;

-- Function fixes STABLE vs. IMMUTABLE problem of the unaccent function.
CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION unaccent_text(text)
  RETURNS text AS
$BODY$
  -- unaccent is STABLE, but indexes must use IMMUTABLE functions.
  SELECT unaccent($1); 
$BODY$
  LANGUAGE sql IMMUTABLE
  COST 1;

-- Create an unaccented index.
CREATE INDEX the_table_label_unaccent_idx
ON the_table USING gin (lower(unaccent_text(label)) gin_trgm_ops);

-- Define the matching threshold.
SELECT set_limit(0.175);

-- Test the query (matching against the index expression).
SELECT
  label
FROM
  the_table
WHERE
  lower(unaccent_text(label)) % 'fil'
ORDER BY
  similarity(label, 'fil') DESC 

Returns "filbert", "fish fillet", and "filé powder".

Without calling SELECT set_limit(0.175);, you can use the double tilde (~~) operator:

-- Test the query (matching against the index expression).
SELECT
  label
FROM
  the_table
WHERE
  lower(unaccent_text(label)) ~~ 'fil'
ORDER BY
  similarity(label, 'fil') DESC 

Also returns "filbert", "fish fillet", and "filé powder".

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I like that you supply your solution in a solid format for others. Also addresses the STABLE vs. IMMUTABLE problem. –  Erwin Brandstetter Apr 19 '12 at 23:30

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