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I am trying to resolve dependency that is depending on a parameter value in my operation that I am calling.

I have this WCF service

public class InformationService : IInformationService
{
    private readonly IValueProvider _valueProvider;

    public InformationService(IValueProvider valueProvider)
    {
        _valueProvider= valueProvider;
    }


    public CompanyReportResponse CompanyReport(string option)
    {
        _valueProvider.Execute(option);
    }
}

I have also registered two concrete types for my ValueProvider in my container.

Registry.For<IValueProvider>().Add<ValueProvider1>().Named("No1");
Registry.For<IValueProvider>().Add<ValueProvider2>().Named("No2");

Is it somehow possible to use different Value Provider depending of the value of option?

Ie, when option is "value1" then _valueProvider will use the concrete type ValueProvider1 and when option is "value2" then _valueProvider will use the concrete type ValueProvider2.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I see at least 2 different options.

If the ValueProvider is only used in that method, you could consider Method Injection. Since at the moment of passing the option argument you already know which one is going to be used, you could provide the implementation for IValueProvider to use as an additional argument.

public CompanyReportResponse CompanyReport(string option, IValueProvider provider)
{
    _provider.Execute(option);
}

The second option is to define a factory to build your ValueProvider, and inject this factory via constructor injection. The factory will have a method for instantiating the correct ValueProvider depending on the option argument.

public interface IValueProviderFactory
{
    IValueProvider CreateProvider(string option);
}

public class ValueProviderFactory : IValueProviderFactory
{
    public IValueProvider CreateProvider(string option)
    {
         // Insert custom instantiation logic here:
         // if option == "value1" return ValueProvider1 and so on
    }
}

public class InformationService : IInformationService
{
    private readonly IValueProviderFactory _valueProviderFactory;

    public InformationService(IValueProviderFactory valueProviderFactory)
    {
        _valueProviderFactory = valueProviderFactory;
    }

    public CompanyReportResponse CompanyReport(string option)
    {
        var valueProvider = _valueProviderFactory.CreateProvider(option);
        valueProvider.Execute(option);
    }
}
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This was very much like my first thought of solution since I was first intending to have a private method in InformationService. Now I changed it to use a separate factory, as your second solution, but I also use GetInstance to retrieve correct concrete type from my container. –  Per Apr 24 '12 at 21:39

+1 for @filpen's answer. I like to add a thirdd option. Instead of injecting a factory or doing context based injection, you can introduce a proxy that delegates to the correct implementation:

public SwitchingValueProviderProxy: IValueProvider
{
    private readonly ValueProvider1 provider1;
    private readonly ValueProvider2 provider2;

    public SwitchingValueProviderProxy(
        ValueProvider1 provider1,
        ValueProvider2 provider2)
    {
        this.provider1 = provider1;
        this.provider2 = provider2;
    }

    void IValueProvider.Execute(option option)
    {
        this.GetProvider(option).Execute(option);
    }

    private IValueProvider GetProvider(string option)
    {
        // custom instance logic here
        if (option.EndsWith("1"))
            return this.provider1;

        if (option.EndsWith("2"))
            return this.provider2;

        throw InvalidOperationException();
    }
}

This has a few clear advantages. First of all, this completely hides the factory and the logic that determines which provider to execute from the client. The client now only depends on the IValueProvider interface. Next, the configuration gets very clean now:

Registry.For<IValueProvider>()
    .Add<SwitchingValueProviderProxy>();

That's it. If you which, you could still extract the selection logic into an IValueProviderFactory and inject that into the SwitchingValueProviderProxy, this keeps this class simple and focussed and still keeps the rest of the application ignorant about a factory.

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+1 neat. It is interesting how you hid the factory behind an implementation of IValueProvider, yet you have to change the proxy every time IValueProvider changes. If we want to see it under the light of the SRP, the class has two responsibilities: forwarding the calls to the implementation (proxy) and instantiating the correct class (factory), so I'm not sure this solution has clear advantages over the factory one, beside clients depending on 1 abstraction instead of 2, which may or may not be an issue. –  Filippo Pensalfini Apr 20 '12 at 10:00
    
@filpen: I wanted to keep things simple, but you are right, you need the factory to adhere to the SRP. Still, adding new value providers means you need to change either the proxy or the factory. Having clients depend only on IValueProvider is cleaner than having to depend the factory as well. However, there is not really an 'issue' when the clients depend on the factory. Your code gets a little bit cleaner, and so do your unit tests. –  Steven Apr 20 '12 at 12:57

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