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I am trying to crop a (non background) image then scale that cropped image by a percentage of the body. The idea I have is to combine all logos and basic graphics on my website into one image so that the browser can cache the image (quicker after the fist download). I then want to scale relative to the body width so that my website will look the same ratio of the page width no matter what the user's monitor size.

This may be easier if I give the html & css then explain it after:

<html>
<head>
    <style>
    body
    {
        padding: 0px;
        margin: 0px;
        width: 100%
    }
    #crop1
    {
        float: left;
        overflow: hidden;
        border: 1px solid red;
        clear: both;
    }
    #crop1 img
    {
        vertical-align: middle;
        margin: -28px 0px -88px -189px; /*top right bottom left*/
    }
    #scale1
    {
        width: 10%;
        border: 1px solid blue;
    }
    #scale1 img
    {
        vertical-align: middle;
        width: 100%;
    }
    #crop2
    {
        float: left;
        overflow: hidden;
        border: 1px solid green;
        width: 100%;
    }
    #crop2 img
    {
        vertical-align: middle;
        margin: -28px 0px -88px -189px; /*top right bottom left*/
    }
    #scale2
    {
        width: 10%;
        border: 1px solid orange;
        clear: both;
    }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
    <img src="http://www.mathleague.com/help/geometry/IMG00088.gif">
    <div id="scale1"><img src="http://www.mathleague.com/help/geometry/IMG00088.gif"></div>
    <div id="crop1"><img src="http://www.mathleague.com/help/geometry/IMG00088.gif"></div>
    <div id="scale2"><div id="crop2"><img src="http://www.mathleague.com/help/geometry/IMG00088.gif"></div></div>
</body>
</html>

I've used the image http://www.mathleague.com/help/geometry/IMG00088.gif in this example. I'm not going to use this image in my website, but the principle will be the same.

So first I just put in the original image, unchanged, to give a size reference while debugging:

<img src="http://www.mathleague.com/help/geometry/IMG00088.gif">

Scaling a separate image down to 10% of the page width works fine:

<div id="scale1">
    <img src="http://www.mathleague.com/help/geometry/IMG00088.gif">
</div>

And cropping the image down to show just the oval shape also works fine:

<div id="crop1">
    <img src="http://www.mathleague.com/help/geometry/IMG00088.gif">
</div>

But I cannot shrink just the oval down to 10% of the page width:

<div id="scale2">
    <div id="crop2">
        <img src="http://www.mathleague.com/help/geometry/IMG00088.gif">
    </div>
</div>

(This crops the oval down to the 10% width, instead of scaling it). Maybe I'm missing some simple css properties on this last line, or maybe I need to add more divs. I'm stuck.

Here is the example image:
Example image

note: the solution must be cross-browser compatible

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Updated with working example (margins needed to be percentage)

To do it the way you are headed is going to be a bit more complex than you realize. For your final sizing, you need to readjust the img size based on the inverse of the percentage that the piece takes up on the whole. Then you have to take that and multiply it with the scaling to then multiply the offsets of your margins.

EDIT The following code is far more exact, as I was able to check and correct my math, and calculate based off your easier image (knowing the size and offsets is critical). The new example gets far closer to correct sizing calculations. I've adjusted below to show the math. Come to find out, the calculation is "easier" than I thought, but what I partly failed to account for was that even the offsets top and bottom should be set off the original width of the image, since width is what is scaling the whole image.

#scale1
{
    width: 10%;
    padding: 0;
    margin: 0;
}

#crop1
{
    overflow: hidden;
    border: 1px solid green;
    width: 100%;
    padding: 0;
    margin: 0;
}

/*Image: 300 W x 209 H
  Offsets: oT = 8, oR = 56, oB = 75, oL = 204
  Icon: 40 w x 126 h */

#crop1 img
{
    width: 750% /* 1 / (40 / 300) [inverse of icon width / image width] */;
    vertical-align: middle;
    /*using the offsets, each has a percentage calculated based solely off 
      the image width, then adjusted based off the width % of the img as 
      calculated above */
    margin: -20%    /* (8 / 300) x 7.5 [the 750%] = 100 x 8 / 40*/
            0       /* right margin seems unnecessary, but if found otherwise, the
                 calculation would be (56 /300) x 7.5 = 100 x 56 / 40*/
            -187.5% /* (75 /300) x 7.5  = 100 x 75 / 40*/
            -510%;  /* (204 / 300)  x 7.5  = 100 x 204 / 40*/
    padding: 0;
    border: 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Ozzy--Firefox. I didn't test in other browsers. Maybe I ought to go look. –  ScottS Apr 20 '12 at 0:08
    
the JS fiddle link - if thats your code then it doesn't work at all in my IE9 browser. –  Ozzy Apr 20 '12 at 0:09
    
@Ozzy--it's choking in Chrome, to. That just goes to show the additional complexity of it (not just the math, but the cross browser rendering). –  ScottS Apr 20 '12 at 0:11
1  
@mullhausen--I think you are missing the part of the point. The 250% is a scale factor based off the original image size because the original image is first scaled down to 10% of its size (like your first scaling), but must then be scaled back up so that just the portion that is the oval is filling the 10%. Setting your scale to 20% works well, the main point is adjusting my initial 40% guess on oval size. You need to go measure the actual pixel width of the oval, and divide by the width of the whole image, then recalculate the numbers. –  ScottS Apr 20 '12 at 9:27
1  
@mulllhausen--Using your new image, I've been able to experiment more exactly with math calculations and readjust my answer (see above) to a better explanation. You will want to make sure your icons have a transparent background or match background color, so that any small 1px rounding errors in the percentages do not show around the icon. –  ScottS Apr 25 '12 at 14:32
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At present the image is not inheriting the parent's width, you can be explicit and force this by declaring 'width: inherit;' on the image:

#crop2 img
{
    vertical-align: middle;
    margin: -28px 0px -88px -189px; /*top right bottom left*/
    width: inherit;
}

Forgot to mention, you'll need to re-adjust the margin to accomodate the newly sized image.

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Use background-position and background-size properties instead.

Example for you:

<!DOCTYPE html>

<style type="text/css">
.pentagon, .pentagon_large {
    background: url(IMG00088.GIF);
}
.pentagon {
    width: 110px;
    height: 110px;
    background-position: 0px 0px;
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
}
.pentagon_large {
    width: 220px;
    height: 220px;
    background-position: 0px 0px;
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    background-size: 300%;
}
</style>

<body>

<div class="pentagon">&nbsp;</div>
<div class="pentagon_large">&nbsp;</div>

Output:

Output with this code

Note: With the F12 developer tool in IE9 you can edit the values (see picture) to quickly find the right size.

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1  
Note: The background-size property is supported in IE9+, Firefox 4+, Opera, Chrome, and Safari 5+. So all new browsers, but not some older ones. –  Ozzy Apr 20 '12 at 0:11
    
sorry - i should have mentioned the solution has to be cross-broser compatible. i'll put this in the question now –  mulllhausen Apr 20 '12 at 0:49
    
@mulllhausen March 2012 stats: 17.4% of net users had older browsers than the ones listed above (down from 62.1% in March 2011). Out of that 17.4%: 9.4% IE8, 2.5% IE7, 0.9% IE6. All (probably) bound to upgrade due to security issues with older browsers. Ref: w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_firefox.asp –  Ozzy Apr 20 '12 at 1:22
    
cheers for the stats. if i knew for certain that all my users were going to be using ie9+ then i would look into this solution. but unfortunately a lot of people will not be upgrading even from ie7 for a while. the defense forces for example must put each iteration of ie through about a year's worth of testing before they bring it into use. its stupid i know, but there you have it –  mulllhausen Apr 20 '12 at 1:45
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in the end i went for the following method:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <style>
    body
    {
        padding: 0px;
        margin: 0px;
        width: 100%
    }
    #d2
    {
        top: 0;
        bottom: 0;
        left: 0;
        right: 0;
        position: absolute;
        overflow: hidden;
    }
    #d1
    {
        bottom: 0;
        right: 0;
        width: 251.59%; /*B*/
        height: 152.31%; /*C*/
        position: absolute;
    }
    #d0
    {
        top: 0;
        left: 0;
        width: 100%; /*A*/
        position: absolute;
    }
    #d0 img
    {
        width: 100%;
        float: left;
    }
    #container
    {
        top: 100px; /*final position of the copped section from the page top (in px)*/
        left: 40%; /*final left position of the copped section relative to page width*/
        display: inline-block;
        position: relative;
        width: 30%; /*final width of the copped selection relative to the page width*/
    }
    #dummy
    {
        margin-top: 51.587%; /*R*/
    }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
    <div id="container"><div id="dummy"></div>
        <div id="d2"><div id="d1"><div id="d0"><img src="http://i.stack.imgur.com/MLWNd.gif"></div></div></div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>

the required inputs are: selection_width, selection_height, selection_top, selection_left and image_width, like so:

image to be cropped and scaled

(image_width is the width of the entire image shown here). so:

selection_top:    34 (just inside the boundary so that we do not show the border)
selection_left:   191 (also just inside the boundary so that we do not show the border)
selection_width:  126 (=317-191 where 317 is also just inside the right-side boundary)
selection_height: 65 (=99-34 where 99 is also just inside the bottom boundary)
image_width:      318

and the required outputs are A, B, C, R (from the comments in the code above). crunching the numbers gives:

A: 100.32%
B: 251.59%
C: 152.31%
R: 51.587%

now the browser window can be un-maximised and resized and the oval will retain its original shape while always being a percentage of the page width and and positioned from the left by a percentage of the page width. in other words, the browser will always look the same width on any screen. note that due to rendering inaccuracies, the border around the oval does appear faintly, even though selection_* specify that the final image will be just inside the shown selection border. for this reason it is best to leave a few pixels between crop selections in the final single image.

now you can put all your theme images for the entire website onto one single image and use this technique to extract the various components and position and scale them as required. this gets around the problem of limited parallel downloads (present in most browsers). i have done an example of all the shapes from this single image, aligned to fit the width of the page here: http://jsfiddle.net/KsNku/ (if anybody comes across a browser which does not render this code like so: http://i.stack.imgur.com/O50vX.png please let me know and i will edit the css to fix the issue). try resizing the jsfiddle browser window and see how everything appears to remain stationary, without any javascript!!

of course a website entirely consisting of this type of layout would require careful design - the user would not be able to zoom in to anything, unless they can maximise the screen further. this would mean that mobile devices will show the page as absolutely tiny. if this is a problem then the technique can be used in limited areas (eg for images in a popup). if you know that all of your users will not be accessing this site with a mobile device (possibly because you have a separate subdomain for mobile phone users) then this technique should be fine.

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