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I am doing a project at the moment and I need an efficient method for calculating prime numbers. I have used the sieve of Eratosthenes but, I have been searching around and have found that the sieve of Atkin is a more efficient method. I have found it difficult to find an explanation (that I have been able to understand!) of this method. How does it work? Example code (preferably in C or python) would be brilliant.

Edit: thanks for your help, the only thing that I still do not understand is what the x and y variables are referring to in the pseudo code. Could someone please shed some light on this for me?

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This looks a lot like a university question... –  Spence Jun 21 '09 at 12:15
11  
or a Project Euler question –  David Johnstone Jun 21 '09 at 12:26
    
related: stackoverflow.com/questions/2068372/… –  J.F. Sebastian Jul 25 '10 at 18:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The wiki page is always a good place to start. If you see the end of the page, it links to examples in both C and Python:

Here's the Python function, copied from the second link:

def sieveOfErat(end):  
  if end < 2: return []  

  #The array doesn't need to include even numbers  
  lng = ((end/2)-1+end%2)  

  # Create array and assume all numbers in array are prime  
  sieve = [True]*(lng+1)  

  # In the following code, you're going to see some funky  
  # bit shifting and stuff, this is just transforming i and j  
  # so that they represent the proper elements in the array.  
  # The transforming is not optimal, and the number of  
  # operations involved can be reduced.  

  # Only go up to square root of the end  
  for i in range(int(sqrt(end)) >> 1):  

    # Skip numbers that aren’t marked as prime  
    if not sieve[i]: continue  

    # Unmark all multiples of i, starting at i**2  
    for j in range( (i*(i + 3) << 1) + 3, lng, (i << 1) + 3):  
      sieve[j] = False  

  # Don't forget 2!  
  primes = [2]  

  # Gather all the primes into a list, leaving out the composite numbers  
  primes.extend([(i << 1) + 3 for i in range(lng) if sieve[i]])  

  return primes  
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1  
As an aside; what's the general policy here for citing other websites? The reason I ask is I considered copy-pasting one of the examples from the wikipedia article, but I decided against it as that's a perfectly good resource and I'd just be duplicating the content here; the better solution would to encourage the OP to look on wikipedia first for standard questions such as this. Any thoughts? –  Dave Rigby Jun 21 '09 at 12:22
4  
@Dave: I understand your slight confusion regarding this. The policy is generally to quote the web page from which you are taking the information (either text or code) and then paste as much as appears sensible from the appropiate parts of the page. There are two primary reasons for this: a) convenice to whomever is reading the answer, b) if the linked web page happens to go down/be modified at any point, the original content is still preserved on SO. Not all of these reasons apply in all cases, but it's nonetheless good practice. Crediting the source is of course a must, as you have done. –  Noldorin Jun 21 '09 at 12:28
2  
Saying that, encouraging someone do do their own research is usually a good thing. In this case, since we've already pointed the OP to the wiki page, it's not really doing to much to provide the code example too, IMO. –  Noldorin Jun 21 '09 at 12:31
2  
The wiki page was the first page I looked at in relation to the problem but I didn't fully understand the pseudo code. When I looked elsewhere a lot of people had copied and pasted the wiki page so I wasn't able to find the answers to my questions (that I could understand). –  marc lincoln Jun 22 '09 at 13:54
6  
At the time of this writing, krenzel.info is down. So I'm glad someone copied the Python code here - that's what I was looking for :) –  jnylen Oct 15 '09 at 0:13

The Wikipedia page looks pretty comprehensive - it even has links to implementations in C and Python.

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Here's a c++ implementation of sieve of atkins that might help you...

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>
#include <fstream>
#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
using namespace std;

#define  limit  1000000

int root = (int)ceil(sqrt(limit));
bool sieve[limit];
int primes[(limit/2)+1];

int main (int argc, char* argv[])
{
   //Create the various different variables required
   FILE *fp=fopen("primes.txt","w");
   int insert = 2;
   primes[0] = 2;
   primes[1] = 3;
   for (int z = 0; z < limit; z++) sieve[z] = false; //Not all compilers have false as the       default boolean value
   for (int x = 1; x <= root; x++)
   {
        for (int y = 1; y <= root; y++)
        {
             //Main part of Sieve of Atkin
             int n = (4*x*x)+(y*y);
             if (n <= limit && (n % 12 == 1 || n % 12 == 5)) sieve[n] ^= true;
             n = (3*x*x)+(y*y);
             if (n <= limit && n % 12 == 7) sieve[n] ^= true;
             n = (3*x*x)-(y*y);
             if (x > y && n <= limit && n % 12 == 11) sieve[n] ^= true;
        }
   }
        //Mark all multiples of squares as non-prime
   for (int r = 5; r <= root; r++) if (sieve[r]) for (int i = r*r; i < limit; i += r*r) sieve[i] = false;
   //Add into prime array
   for (int a = 5; a < limit; a++)
   {
            if (sieve[a])
            {
                  primes[insert] = a;
                  insert++;
            }
   }
   //The following code just writes the array to a file
   for(int i=0;i<1000;i++){
             fprintf(fp,"%d",primes[i]);
             fprintf(fp,", ");
   }

   return 0;

}

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This looks like a translation of WP's pseudocode, but look at the talk page where there's discussion about that pseudocode being no good really. See this subsection en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… esp. towards its end. –  Will Ness Oct 23 '12 at 9:24
    
It looks to be worth quoting one phrase by "EJ" = Emil Jeřábek as "the relative speed of the sieve of Atkin vs. sieve of Eratosthenes is extremely sensitive to various optimization tricks used in the implementation" where he explains that while the SoA is very slightly theoretically faster than the SoE, this is very difficult to realize in practice. A short code segment as posted here will not have those maximum optimizations, which are very much more complex than basic optimizations of the SoE, so generally the SoA is slower than the SoE for quick and easy implementations. –  GordonBGood Aug 2 '13 at 16:06

Edit: the only thing that I still do not understand is what the x and y variables are referring to in the pseudo code. Could someone please shed some light on this for me?

For a basic explanation of the common use of the 'x' and 'y' variables in the Wikipedia page pseudo-code (or other better implementations of the Sieve of Atkin), you might find my answer to another related question helpful.

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// Title : Seive of Atkin ( Prime number Generator) 

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    ios_base::sync_with_stdio(false);
    long long int n;
    cout<<"Enter the value of n : ";
    cin>>n;
    vector<bool> is_prime(n+1);
    for(long long int i = 5; i <= n; i++)
    {
        is_prime[i] = false;
    }
    long long int lim = ceil(sqrt(n));

    for(long long int x = 1; x <= lim; x++)
    {
        for(long long int y = 1; y <= lim; y++)
        {
            long long int num = (4*x*x+y*y);
            if(num <= n && (num % 12 == 1 || num%12 == 5))
            {
                is_prime[num] = true;
            }

            num = (3*x*x + y*y);
            if(num <= n && (num % 12 == 7))
            {
                is_prime[num] = true;
            }

            if(x > y)
            {
                num = (3*x*x - y*y);
                if(num <= n && (num % 12 == 11))
                {
                    is_prime[num] = true;
                }
            }
        }
    }
    // Eliminating the composite by seiveing
    for(long long int i = 5; i <= lim; i++)
    {
        if(is_prime[i])
            for(long long int j = i*i; j <= n; j += i)
            {
                is_prime[j] = false;
            }
    }
    // Here we will start printing of prime number
   if(n > 2)
   {
       cout<<"2\t"<<"3\t";
   }
   for(long long int i = 5; i <= n; i++)
   {
         if(is_prime[i])
         {
             cout<<i<<"\t";
         }
    }
    cout<<"\n";
    return 0;
}
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protected by Noldorin Nov 28 '12 at 0:05

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