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I'm having some trouble in python with classes and objects. I have two classes, and I instantiated an object of each. I'd like to pass those objects into a function when the user types a certain string. The function would then call a class method of the object it takes. (The methods have the same name for each class). I made an example file below:

    class Test1(object):

       def method1(self):
          print("test1")

    class Test2(object):

       def method1(self):
          print("test2")


    def Call(something):
       return something.method1

    def Call2(something):
       y = input("> ")
       return something.method1

    array = [Test1(), Test2()]
    my_dict = {'call': Call(array[0]), 'call2': Call2(array[1])}


    x = input("> ")

    if x in my_dict:
       my_dict[x]()

What I think happens is Call2() gets called at runtime and ask for input. Then the second input() gets called. Could someone explain why Call2() runs even when the if statement doesn't get a chance to evaluate a string? There is probably a lot of things I'm misunderstanding. Any help is appreciated.

EDIT: Okay, I understand that the functions are called during the declaration of the dict. How would you go about linking a function to the dict while still passing the object to it?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you run this, it will get to this line:

my_dict = {'call': Call(array[0]), 'call2': Call2(array[1])}

That will call Call and Call2 - this is where the first input is being called (you can see this if you change your input prompts to something different for each one, so you can tell which one is being called (i.e. rather than "> ").

Does that clarify things, or is it something different you're not understanding?

share|improve this answer
    
That makes sense, thank you. I just need a way to declare it in the dict without calling it. – Chris Harris Apr 19 '12 at 22:35
1  
@user1343005, if I understand you correctly, you're hoping to bind the function to the particular argument without calling the function. One way to do that is to create a new function, using lambda like so: my_dict = {'call': lambda: Call(array[0]), 'call2': lambda: Call2(array[1])}. See here. – senderle Apr 19 '12 at 22:42

Q: Could someone explain why Call2() runs even when the if statement doesn't get a chance to evaluate a string?

You're calling both functions here:

my_dict = {'call': Call(array[0]), 'call2': Call2(array[1])}

Q: How would you go about linking a function to the dict while still passing the object to it?

What is usually done is provide the function and the args sepatate from each other. Here's an example:

>>> def the_caller(f, args=()):
...     return f(*args)
... 
>>> def present_me(name):
...     return 'My name is ' + name
... 
>>> the_caller(present_me, args=('Rik',))
'My name is Rik'

Your sample code is too badly designed to build something that could make sense.

share|improve this answer

Your code calls the function when defining the dict.

my_dict = {'call': (lambda: Call(array[0])), 'call2': (lambda: Call2(array[1]))}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, I didn't learn about the lambda until now! – Chris Harris Apr 19 '12 at 22:56

Using your original code with lots of extra stuff whacked out, this should do what you're trying to do:

class Test1(object):

   def method1(self):
      print("test1")

class Test2(object):

   def method1(self):
      print("test2")

my_dict = {'call': Test1(), 'call2': Test2()}

x = input("> ")

if x in my_dict:
   my_dict[x].method1()
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but my purpose was that the strings tell which method to call on an object. So an event later can change the object, and then the strings would be linked to the new object, calling methods of the same name – Chris Harris Apr 19 '12 at 22:55

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