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Can I initialize an STL vector with 10 of the same integer in an initializer list? My attempts so far have failed me.

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6  
There's a std::vector<> constructor (2) that does that; why would you want an initializer list? –  ildjarn Apr 19 '12 at 22:30
    
@ildjarn: I think he means in a constructor initialization list, and not in the constructor body. –  GManNickG Apr 19 '12 at 23:04
    
@GManNickG: It doesn't sound like that to me. The OP asks for a way to initialize a vector with X number of elements all set to the same value. Yes, he does mention an initialization list, but seeing as there is already a constructor which meets the requirement that should be good enough –  Ed S. Apr 20 '12 at 17:46
    
@EdS.: To clarify, I think the OP is asking how to do this: struct foo { foo() : INIT_HERE {} }; rather than this: struct foo { foo() { INIT_HERE; } };. –  GManNickG Apr 20 '12 at 18:25
    
Yes GManNickG that is what I was looking for. –  Xavier Apr 20 '12 at 21:27

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think you mean this:

struct test {
   std::vector<int> v;
   test(int value) : v( 100, value ) {}
};
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Use the appropriate constructor, which takes a size and a default value.

int number_of_elements = 10;
int default_value = 1;
std::vector<int> vec(number_of_elements, default_value);
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can you post what you are doing

 int i = 100;
vector<int> vInts2 (10, i);

vector<int>::iterator iter;
for(iter = vInts2.begin(); iter != vInts2.end(); ++iter)
{
    cout << " i " << (*iter) << endl;
}
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If you're using C++11 and on GCC, you could do this:

vector<int> myVec () {[0 ... 99] = 1};

It's called ranged initialization and is a GCC-only extension.

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1  
Wow, I've never even heard of that. Of course, it's better to just use the right constructor. –  chris Apr 19 '12 at 22:34
    
Yep. But this comes handy for arrays and structs. Anyway, GCC has a bunch of extensions that do crazy things. Best stick to standard C++. –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi Apr 19 '12 at 22:41

You can do that with std::vector constructor:

vector(size_type count, 
                 const T& value,
                 const Allocator& alloc = Allocator());

Which takes count and value to be repeated.

If you want to use initializer lists you can write:

const int x = 5;
std::vector<int> vec {x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x};
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The initialization list for vector is supported from C++0x. If you compiled with C++98

int number_of_elements = 10;
int default_value = 1;
std::vector<int> vec(number_of_elements, default_value);
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