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SQLite is fine as a single-access database, but it gets risky when used by more than one user at a time. MySQL, Firebird, PostgreSQL etc. are more difficult to deploy and are simply overkill for my use.

Ideally, I'd like a compact, single-EXE server meant to run on low-spec hardware (eg. 128MB RAM, 256MB flash RAM) that would be as easy to work with as SQLite, and is available for Linux (and Windows, so I can use the same code client-side in case customers prefer a regular PC.)

Do you know of an application that fits those requirements?

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If you only have 256mb of storage, why do you need an SQL database? –  alex Jun 23 '09 at 17:33
    
By what basis do you make the assertion that SQLlite is risky when used by multiple users? Just curious... –  t3rse Jul 15 '09 at 15:07
    
Without a server to handle concurrent accesses, it's risky to share an SQLite file among multiple hosts and allow users to make changes. –  Gulbahar Jul 21 '09 at 11:35
    
But SQLite doesn't permit concurrent access. It locks a file while it's connected to it, so only one user can ever access a SQLite file at any one time. I'm guessing you're looking for a solution that does permit concurrent access? –  eksortso Nov 19 '09 at 21:17
    
What I meant was that accessing SQLite from a remote computer is definitely not safe. If no network-based solution is available, I'll write my own wrapper. Thank you. –  Gulbahar Dec 16 '09 at 15:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Give Firebird a try. It's cross platform and lightweight. Databases consist of single files.

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You might try looking at Apache Derby (http://db.apache.org/derby/). It's Java, so it'll be portable and it's definitely lightweight.

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While Java is "portable" every single linux administrator will hate you for requiring Java for the database unless your application already uses it. For example, certain grsecurity kernel options make the system more secure, but also prevent a Java VM from running. –  ThiefMaster Aug 25 '13 at 10:50

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