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I am writing a powershell advanced function that will take input from the pipeline. More specifically, I will be piping in from import-csv. The problem is the column headers to the csv file I am using uses syntax invalid to ps. Here is what my code is like

function my-function{
    [CmdletBinding()]
    params
    (
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$false,ValueFromPipeline=$true,          
                    ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName=$true)]
        [string]$Id = $_.ID,


        [(Parameter(Mandatory=$false,ValueFromPipeline=$true,
                      ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName=$true)]
        [string]$IdRaw =  $_."ID(RAW)",
    )

    BEGIN{
         #Sets up a db connection
    }
    PROCESS{
         #Builds an insert query with csv members
    }
    END{
         #closes db connection
    }
}

ID,ID(RAW),Date Time,Date Time(RAW),Type,Type(RAW)
29874,29874,4/18/2012 23:58,41018.20753, Servername, ServernameRaw

When I execute this with my csv input, the value of $Id becomes 2905, while the $IdRaw variable takes on a string representation of the entire $_ hashtable. Just to elaborate any paramter with a valid name {URL, ID, Status} all work. Any that contain a space or (RAW) receive the entire $_ variable.

-Patrick

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted
#Edit to include updated code
$x=import-csv c:\temp\testinput.csv

function my-function{
 [CmdletBinding()]
    param
    (
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$false,ValueFromPipeline=$true, ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName=$true)][string]$Id,
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$false,ValueFromPipeline=$true,ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName=$true)]
        [alias("ID(RAW)")][string]$IdRaw 
    )

    begin{
         #Sets up a db connection
         Write-Debug "Starting"
    }
    process {
         #Builds an insert query with csv members
         write-debug "IDRaw=$IDRaw"
    }
    end {
         #closes db connection
                 Write-Debug "Ending"

    }
}

$x | my-function
sample file contents

ID,ID(RAW),Date Time,Date Time(RAW),Type,Type(RAW) 29874,29877,4/18/2012 23:58,41018.20753, Servername1, ServernameRaw1 29875,29878,4/19/2012 23:58,41018.20753, Servername2, ServernameRaw2 29876,29879,4/20/2012 23:58,41018.20753, Servername3, ServernameRaw3

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that was my first instinct, but when I do it that way all variables with column headers containing valid variable names function properly, while the ones with invalid names that I reference in quotations do not. When I run the example above, $Id takes on 2905 while the value of $IdRaw = $$_."Id(RAW)" becomes a hashtable of all the pipline input. Am I doing something else wrong? –  Patrick Wall Apr 20 '12 at 13:21
    
I've never had issues like that using quoted property names (and I've done it a bunch). Can you edit your post to include a few rows of the file? –  Mike Shepard Apr 20 '12 at 14:38
    
I can add more code to begin process and end methods if necessary. –  Patrick Wall Apr 20 '12 at 15:14
    
I really meant the csv file, since it's where the problem is coming from (I think). –  Mike Shepard Apr 20 '12 at 15:16
    
The file has more columns but follow the same scheme, and also, If I do an import-csv from the powershell console I can maniputlate the imported objects with quoted properties just fine, it only screws up in the function –  Patrick Wall Apr 20 '12 at 15:28

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