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Here is a module containing some methods:

module M
  def x; y; end
  def y; ...; end
end

Here's a class:

class C
  def z; ...; end
end

I have two instances of C:

 c1 = C.new
 c2 = C.new

Is there something I can do to c1 such that c1.class has x and y, but c2.class doesn't? I don't see a straightforward way to subvert the method lookup.

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1  
Can you elaborate on the use case? Using class methods for instance-specific functionality seems like a generally bad idea. –  rcrogers Apr 20 '12 at 2:33
    
@rcrogers: No kidding, but tell that to the Rails core developers. This is exactly how scopes work (and is the problem I'm trying to solve here, as I mentioned in a comment below). –  John Feminella Apr 20 '12 at 20:15
    
What is C#z for? –  Andrew Grimm Apr 22 '12 at 3:03
    
@JohnFeminella Can you provide an example of your code using scopes in this way? –  Andrew Grimm Apr 22 '12 at 3:07
1  
Calling a scope as an instance method? Yeah, definitely need an example. What about the scope makes it important that c1 has it but c2 doesn't? –  rcrogers Apr 22 '12 at 17:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You could override c1.class to return something other than C (and that other thing would extend M). Other than that, no.

Note that overriding c1.class is almost certainly a bad idea. An object shouldn't lie about what its class is.

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1  
I'm accepting this since it's the only one that actually answers the question ("no, it can't be done"). –  John Feminella Apr 22 '12 at 23:31

Rather than doing c1.class.x, why not do c1.x, as the Law Of Demeter would suggest?

class C
  def self.x
    "hi"
  end
end

c1 = C.new
c2 = C.new
def c1.x
  self.class.x
end
c1.x # => "hi"
c2.x # NoMethodError
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1  
I'm familiar with the law of Demeter, but as I said, the methods I'm trying to add are class methods, not instance methods, and can't be transformed that way. (They are ActiveRecord scopes.) This is therefore not a valid solution. –  John Feminella Apr 20 '12 at 20:16
1  
@John thanks a lot for down voting me when your original question didn't bother explaining why this wouldn't be a valid solution. –  Andrew Grimm Apr 20 '12 at 23:29
1  
I'm sorry if you feel that I've slighted you in some way, despite the unwarranted assumptions about who's downvoting you. But I think I was pretty clear that these are methods on the class, not methods on the object. (I said it twice in the question, and there's a code snippet to illustrate an example.) If you think it could be clearer, you're certainly welcome to edit it. –  John Feminella Apr 21 '12 at 14:47
    
@JohnFeminella "I'm sorry if you feel that I've slighted you in some way" en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-apology_apology –  Andrew Grimm Apr 22 '12 at 3:07

Maybe this

c1.extend(M)

c1.methods & [:x, :y] #=> [:x, :y]
c2.methods & [:x, :y] #=> []
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That doesn't affect the methods that c1.class and c2.class have though. –  sepp2k Apr 20 '12 at 1:21
    
I didn't see any connection between c1.class and module M, I just made a guess. –  megas Apr 20 '12 at 1:27
    
The OP wants M's methods on c1.class, so that he can call c1.class.x() and c1.class.y(), but not c2.class.x() or c2.class.y(). Your code does not achieve that. –  sepp2k Apr 20 '12 at 1:31
    
Strange, c1.class and c2.class are the same object(or class), what OP really wants? –  megas Apr 20 '12 at 1:38

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