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Here is my code:

final Foo myFoo = new Foo(new Inner() {
    @Override
    callback(){
         myFoo.bar();
    }
});

(With actual function names)

final MyArrayAdapter aa = new MyArrayAdapter(new View.OnClickListener() {
    @Override
    onClick(){
         aa.notifyDataSetChanged();
    }
});

Java is giving me an error about how myFoo might not have been initialized. Is there any way to fix this? I can potentially set the callback to null when I construct the object and then change it afterwards, but I'd hope for there to be a cleaner way. Any ideas? (Also that wouldn't work if Foo wasn't written by me and didn't expose an interface to change the callback later)

In case anyone is curious, in my specific scenario, Foo is an ArrayAdapter, and the bar is notifyDataSetChanged(). What is displayed by the adapter depends on the values of the items in the array, and those values change when they are clicked on. The callback is the clickListener.

share|improve this question
    
Can you not just refer to this.bar() or bar()? –  Tony Ennis Apr 20 '12 at 1:33
    
no, my actual code is more complex than this example, and the callback is within another anonymous inner class –  Drew Apr 20 '12 at 2:08
    
Why would you override notifyDataSetChanged? From the API docs, it seems that you should be calling myFoo.registerDataSetObserver(new DataSetObserver(){}). –  sharakan Apr 20 '12 at 2:27
    
When one of the items in the data of the ArrayAdapter changes (due to clicking on it) the rest of the things in the ArrayAdapter need to be redrawn. Is there a better way to do that than calling notifyDataSetChanged()? –  Drew Apr 20 '12 at 2:43
    
You need to pass myFoo to The constructor of Inner. Fix that. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Apr 20 '12 at 2:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Short answer is that you definitely can't do that in Java, but the compiler already told you that. You're trying to create two objects at once with references to each other, it's a chicken and egg problem. Bottom line, you have to create ONE of them first.

A suggestion is a two step creation:

....
final MyArrayAdapter aa = new MyArrayAdapter();
aa.initializeButtonClickListener();
....

and then add the 'initialize' method to the adapter.

public void initializeButtonClickListener(){
    this.button.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
        @Override
        onClick(){
             notifyDataSetChanged();
        }
    });
}

Because that construction is somewhat complicated (ie, more complicated than simply calling a constructor), I'd recommend then pulling those two lines in to a MyArrayAdapter factory method, and making the constructor private.

share|improve this answer
    
OK, I can see why this isn't possible. I rewrote it to set the callback after the first object is create. I'm not sure why I shouldn't be calling notifyDataSetChanged() though, I want to redraw everything when one element of the array changes. –  Drew Apr 20 '12 at 3:58
    
Hmm... I think I got confused by the names in your example. I thought that Inner was a DataSetObserver, getting called by the Adapter, not calling it. Where is the object that the ClickListener (ie, Inner) is listening to? I would think there would be three lines: create an ArrayAdapter, create a ClickListener that calls .notifyDataSetChanged, then create a 'Clickable' (a View, I suppose) object which uses ArrayAdapter as it's 'model', and then call view.setOnClickListener(listener) to complete the circle. –  sharakan Apr 20 '12 at 12:11
    
Alright I added a a version with my actual scenario. The button that the clicklistener is attached to is inside the adapter. –  Drew Apr 20 '12 at 17:25
    
@Drew In that case, I would have a delegate method on MyArrayAdapter called setOnClickListenerToButton that calls this.button.setOnClickListener(). I'll change the code appropriately. I'd suggest that the next step would be to perhaps pull that complex creation out in to a Factory method, but that's up to you. –  sharakan Apr 20 '12 at 18:00
    
I went with the 2 step creation one. The Factory sounds like a good idea, but I'm not sure how it will solve the problem of needing 2 steps, I still can't construct both objects with references to each other. –  Drew Apr 20 '12 at 19:05

This will work in general and without access the Inner definition, but you do need to create a helper class:

class CallbackHelper {
    private Foo foo;
    public void setFoo( Foo f ){ foo = f; }
    public Foo getFoo(){ return foo; }
}

And then use it like this:

final CallbackHelper cbh = new CallbackHelper();
Foo myFoo = new Foo(new Inner() {
    @Override
    callback(){
         cbh.getFoo().bar();
    }
});
cbh.setFoo( myFoo );
share|improve this answer

You could declare a method callBarOnMyFoo in the containing class and call it from your callback:

void callBarOnMyFoo() {
    myFoo.bar();
}

Then your callback would need to call callBarOnMyFoo, which is an instance method of the outer class, which the Inner code should have a reference to (I forget the syntax for it offhand).

share|improve this answer
    
myFoo is a local variable though, and callBarOnMyFoo wouldn't have access to it. I guess I could turn it into a member, but that seems just as ugly as my solution of setting the listener after constructing –  Drew Apr 20 '12 at 2:10

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